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Student College Planning Guide

General College Requirements

The following is a chart that will give you an idea of what classes you should be enrolled in, whether you are applying to an “average,” “competitive,” or “very competitive” university. In looking at the following chart, keep the following important point in mind:

  • If at all possible, begin algebra no later than the ninth grade. Discuss with your counselor what can be done to improve your success in math, particularly, in algebra.

  • Foreign language should be started in the ninth grade.

  • Be sure that you are enrolled in laboratory science classes that will meet the requirements of colleges in which you intend to apply.

  • Most colleges look at not only what classes are taken, but also the level of that class. These schools recognize the classes that are designated “college preparatory, honors and advanced placement.” Honors and advanced placement classes are given an additional grade point in the calculation of your GPA. These classes identify you as one who is able to take the most rigorous course work. The classes will enhance your college applications, particularly to the more competitive colleges throughout the United States.

Grade

Average College

Competitive College

Very Competitive College

9

Algebra I

English

Physical Science

Algebra I

Foreign Language (1st year)

English

Physical Science

Geometry

Foreign Language (2nd year)

English

Physical Science

10

Algebra I or Geometry

Foreign Language (1st year)

Biology

World History

English

College prep elective

Geometry

Foreign Language (2nd year)

Biology

World History

English

College prep elective

Algebra II

Foreign Language (3rd year)

Biology

World History

English

College prep elective

11

Algebra II or Geometry

Foreign Language (2nd year)

Chemistry

U.S. History

English

College prep elective

Algebra II

Foreign Language (3rd year)

Chemistry

U.S. History

English

College prep elective

Trigonometry/Calculus

Foreign Language (4th year)

Chemistry

U.S. History

English

College prep elective

12

Algebra II

Foreign Language (3rd year)

Government/Economics

English

College prep elective

Trigonometry/Calculus

Government/Economics

Physics/science elective

English

College prep elective

Calculus

Physics

Government/Economics

English

College prep elective

10th Grade College Planning Guide

September

  • Take the PSAT in October. The PSAT is a preliminary test that will prepare you for the SAT I.

  • Take the NCAA-approved courses if you want to play sports in college.

October

  • Take the PSAT for practice. The results will not be used for college admission.

  • Sign up, if you have not done so already, for co-curricular activities that interest you. The level of involvement and accomplishment is most important, not the number of activities.

  • Keep a record of your co-curricular involvement, volunteer work, and employment (all year).

November

  • Make sure you are “on top” of your academic work. If necessary, meet with your teacher for additional help.

December

  • Receive results of the PSAT. Read materials sent with your score report. Consult your guidance counselor to explore ways to improve on future standardized tests and courses to discuss which may be required or beneficial for your post-high school plans

January

  • Keep studying!

  • Volunteer-a great way to identify your interests and to develop skills.

February

  • It is never too early to start researching colleges and universities. Visit your guidance office to browse through literature and guidebooks or surf the Web and check out college and university home pages.

March

  • Check with your guidance counselor and school career center for on-line links for resources to help you in the college admission process.

April

  • Register for June SAT II: Subject Test. These are one-hour exams testing you on academic subjects that you have already completed. Among the many to choose from are biology, chemistry, foreign languages, and physics. Many colleges require three SAT II: Subject Tests. One of these tests should be Writing and one should be Math 1C or 2C; usually, the third can be of your choosing. Not all SAT II: Subject Tests are given on every test date. Check the calendar carefully to determine when the Subject Tests you want are offered.

  • See your college advisor for advice.

  • Continue to research career options and consider possible college majors that will help you achieve your career goals.

May

  • Plan now for wise use of your summer. Consider taking a summer course or participating in a special program (e.g., for prospective engineers or journalists or for those interested in theater or music) at a local college or community college. Consider working or volunteering.

June

  • Take the SAT II: Subject Tests that you registered for in April. Consider electing score choice so you can see your test scores before deciding whether to release the results to colleges. It’s a good idea to plan on taking the SAT II: Subject Tests again in the spring of your junior year or the fall of you senior year. You then have the option of releasing only your bests scores to colleges.

  • If you work, save some of your earnings for college.

July

  • During the summer, you may want to sign up for the PSAT/SAT prep course, use computer software, or do the practice tests in books designed to familiarize you with standardized tests.

August

  • Make your summer productive. Continue reading to increase your vocabulary.

11th Grade College Planning Calendar

September

  • Register for the PSAT in October.

  • Maintain your co-curricular record (all year).

October

  • Junior year PSAT scores may qualify a student for the National Merit Scholarship Competition and the National Achievement and the National Hispanic Scholars Programs. So, even though these scores will not be used for college admission, it is still a good idea to take the PSAT. The more times you take standardized test, the more familiar you will become with the format and the types of questions asked. If you wish to receive free information from colleges, indicate on the PSAT test answer form that you want to participate in the Student Search.

November

  • Junior year grades are extremely important in the college admission process, because they are a measure of how well you do in advanced, upper-level courses. Grades also are used to determine scholarships and grants for which you may be eligible. So put in the extra effort and keep those grades up!

  • If you require financial aid, start researching your options for grants, scholarships, and work-study programs. Do research on the internet. Go to your school counselor or school career center for assistance.

December

  • During December, you should receive the results of your PSAT. Read your score report and consult your school counselor to determine how you might improve on future standardized tests. The PSAT is excellent preparation for the SAT I, which you will take in spring.

  • If you plan to take the ACT (American College Test), register now for the February ACT. Many colleges accept the ACT or the SAT I. Some colleges require the ACT or both SAT I and SAT II. When you begin to explore different colleges or universities, double-check to see if they prefer or require the ACT, the SAT I and/or the SAT II.

January

  • Begin to make a preliminary list of colleges you would like to investigate further. Surf the Internet and use the college resources in your school college center.

  • Ask your parents for your Social Security number (required on many college applications). If you were never issued a Social Security number, contact the nearest Social Security office as soon as possible to obtain a number.

February

  • Meet the college advisor to discuss your preliminary list of colleges. Discuss whether your initial list of colleges meets your needs and interests (academic program, size, location, cost, etc.) and whether you are considering colleges where you are likely to be admitted. You should be optimistic and realistic when applying to colleges.

  • Register for the March SAT I if you have completed the math courses covered on the SAT I. If not, plan to take the SAT I in May or June. Prepare for the SAT I or ACT by signing up for a prep course, using computer software, or doing the SAT/ACT practice tests available in your school college center or at bookstores. But don’t spend so much time trying to improve standardized test scores that grades and co-curricular involvement suffer.



March

  • Write, telephone, or use the internet to request admission literature and financial aid information from the colleges on your list. There is no charge and no obligation to obtain general information about admission and financial aid.

April

  • When selecting your senior courses, be sure to continue to challenge yourself academically.

  • Register for the May/June SAT I and/or the May/June SAT II: Subject Tests. Not all SAT II: Subject Tests are given on every test date. Check the calendar carefully to determine when the Subject Tests you want are offered. Register for the June ACT if you want that test.

  • Continue to evaluate your list of colleges and universities. Eliminate colleges from the original list that no longer interest you and add others as appropriate.

  • Look into summer jobs or apply for special summer academic or enrichment programs. Colleges love to see students using their knowledge and developing their skills and interests.



May

  • Attend a college fair to get more information about colleges on your list. NACAC sponsors college fairs in cities across the country during the fall and spring.

  • Get a jumpstart on summer activities-consider enrolling in an academic course at a local college, pursuing a summer school program, applying for an internship, working, or volunteering. If you work, save part of your earnings for college.

  • Begin visiting colleges. Phone to set up appointments. Interviews are always a good idea. Many colleges will tell you they are optional, but an interview will show interest, enthusiasm, and initiative on your part and provide an excellent opportunity to have your questions answered. Do a practice interview with your counselor, teacher, employer, or a senior who has had college interviews. Set up interviews as early as possible-interview times become booked quickly!

  • Take the SAT I or the SAT II.

June

  • After school ends, get on the road to visit colleges. Seeing the college firsthand, taking a tour, and talking to students can be the greatest help in deciding whether or not a schools is right for you. Although it is ideal to visit colleges during the academic year, going in the summer will be valuable. Admission offices employ their students to give tours and answer questions from prospective students and their parents.

  • Take the SAT I, the SAT II, and/or the ACT.

July

  • Visit colleges, take tours, have interviews, and ask questions. Make college visiting a family event. Involve your parents and siblings in every step of your application process. Choosing the right college is a tough decision; the opinions of those who know you best can provide helpful insight into which college is best for you.

August

  • Continue to refine your list of potential colleges and universities.

  • Begin preparing for the actual application process: draft essays; collect writing samples; and assemble portfolios or audition tapes. If you are an athlete and plan on playing in college, contact the coaches at schools to which you are applying and ask about intercollegiate and intramural sports programs and athletic scholarships.

  • Complete the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse form if you hope to play Division I or II sports. (This form cannot be mailed until you finish your sixth semester of high school.)




12TH Grade College Planning Calendar





September

  • Make sure you have all applications required for college admission and financial aid. Write, phone, or use the Internet to request missing information.

  • Check on application and financial aid deadlines for the schools to which you plan to apply. They may vary and it is essential to meet all deadlines!

  • Meet with the college advisor to be sure your list includes colleges appropriate to your academic and personal record. Review your transcript and co-curricular records with your school counselor to ensure their accuracy.

  • Register for the October/November SAT I and /or SAT II: Subject Test, or September/ October ACT.

  • If the colleges require recommendations. Ask the appropriate people to write on your behalf. At least three weeks before the due date, ask your counselor and teachers, employers, or coaches to write letters of recommendation. Provide recommendation forms, any special instructions and stamped, addressed business envelope to the people writing your recommendation. Be thoughtful! Write thank-you notes to those who write recommendations and keep them informed of your decisions.

  • Plan visits to colleges and set up interviews (if you didn’t get to them during the summer or if you want to return to a campus for a second time). Read bulletin boards and the college newspaper. Talk with current students and professors.

October

  • Attend a regional college fair to investigate further those colleges to which you will probably apply.

  • Mail applications in time to reach the colleges by the deadlines. Check with your guidance counselor to make sure your transcript and test scores have been/will be sent to the colleges to which you are applying.

  • If applying for early decision or early action, send in your application now. Also prepare applications for back-ups schools. Remember, if you are accepted under the early decision option, you are expected to enroll at that college and to withdraw all other applications. Submit financial aid information if requested from early decision/action candidates.

  • Register for the December/January SAT I or SAT II: Subjects Tests, or December ACT if you have not completed the required test or if you are not happy with your previous test scores and think you can do better.

  • Have official test scores sent by the testing agency to colleges on your list.

November

  • Take the SAT I or SAT II if appropriate. Don’t forget to have test scores sent to colleges on your list.

  • Be sure your first quarter grades are good.

  • Continue completing applications to colleges. Make copies of all applications before mailing the applications.

  • If you need financial aid, obtain a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) from the College Center. Check to see if the colleges to which you are applying require any other financial form. Register for the CSS Profile if required and obtain the college’s own financial aid forms, if available.

  • Keep all records, test score reports, and copies of applications for admission and financial aid. Do not throw anything away until at least the end of your first year in college. Having detailed records will save you time and effort should anything be lost or should you decide to apply in the future to other colleges and scholarship programs.

December

  • Have official test scores sent to colleges on your list if you have not done so.

  • Consult the College Advisor again to review your final list of colleges. Be sure you have all bases covered. It is a good idea to make copies of everything before you drop those envelopes in the mail. If for some reason your application gets lost, you will have a back-up copy. File your last college application.

  • If you applied for early decision, you should have an answer by now. If you are accepted, follow the instructions for admitted students. If the decision is deferred until spring or you are denied, submit applications now to other colleges.

January

  • Keep working in your classes! Grades and courses continue to count throughout the senior year.

  • Request that your counselor send the transcript of your first semester grades to the colleges to which you applied.

  • Parents and students, complete your income tax forms as soon as possible. You will need those figures to fill out the FAFSA. Complete and return your FAFSA as quickly as possible after January 1. Check to make sure your colleges or state does not require any other financial aid forms. If they do, consult your guidance counselor or contact the college’s financial office.

February

  • Remember to monitor your applications to be sure that all materials are sent and received on time and that they are complete. Stay on top of things and don’t procrastinate; you can ruin your chances for admission by missing a deadline.

  • If you completed a FAFSA, you should receive your Student Aid Report (SAR) within four weeks after submitting the FAFSA. Review the SAR carefully and check for any inaccuracies. If necessary, correct any items on the SAR and return it to the FAFSA processor (if a college transmitted your data directly, notify the college of any change).

  • If more than four weeks have passed after sending in your FAFSA and you have not received an acknowledgment , contact the Federal Student Aid Information Center at (319) 337-5665. To identify you, they will need your name, Social Security number, address, and date of birth exactly as it was written on your FAFSA.

  • Complete scholarship applications. You may be eligible for more scholarships than you think, so apply for as many as you can.

  • Enjoy your final year in high school, but don’t catch senioritis!


March

  • Stay focused and keep studying-only a couple more months to go!

  • Do not take rolling admission applications for granted. (Some colleges do not have application deadlines; they admit students on a continuous basis.) These schools may reach their maximum class size quickly. The earlier you apply, the more availability there may be.

April

  • Review your college acceptances and financial aid awards. Be sure to compare financial aid packages in your decision-making process. If you are positive you will not enroll at one or more of the colleges that accepted you, please notify those colleges that you have selected another college. Keeping colleges abreast of your plans might enable those colleges to admit someone else. If you know which college you will attend, send your tuition deposit and follow all other instructions for admitted students. You must decide which offer of admission to accept by May 1 (postmark date).

May

  • By May 1, decide on the one college that you will attend. By May 1, send in your tuition deposit to the college you will attend. Notify the others colleges that accepted you that you have selected another college.

  • BE PROUD-you have completed a difficult task.

  • If your first-choice college places you on their waiting list, do not lose all hope. Some students are admitted off the waiting list. Talk with your counselor, and contact the college to let them know you are still very interested. Keep the college updated on your activities.

  • Take Advanced Placement examinations, if appropriate, and request that your AP scores be sent to the college you will attend.

June

  • Request that your counselor send your final transcript to the college you will attend. Notify the college of any private scholarships or grants you will be receiving.

  • Know when the payment for tuition, room and board, meal plans, etc., is due. If necessary, ask the financial aid office about a possible payment plan that will allow for you to pay in installments.

  • Congratulations, you’ve made it through high school! Enjoy your graduation and look forward to college.

July



August



September

  • Look for information in the mail from the college about housing, roommate(s), orientation, course selection, etc. Respond promptly to all request from the college.

  • Ease the transition into college. Accept the fact that you’ll be in charge of your academic and personal life. What you do, when you do it, and how things get done will be up to you. You’ll have new responsibilities and challenges. Think about budgeting your time and establishing priorities. Take charge of the changes that lie ahead and eliminate or minimize pressures. Go forth with confidence and enthusiasm, willingness to adapt, and determination to succeed academically and personally.

  • Pack for college. Don’t forget to include things that remind you of friends and family. Be prepared for the new opportunities and challenges. Have a great freshman year!

COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMS

Most four-year colleges require applicants to take one or more tests for admission. The most common tests are the SAT I (Scholastic Aptitude Test), the SAT II-Subject Tests, and the ACT (American College Test). While test scores are never the only criteria considered for admission, they are a major factor in support of an applicant’s academic record.

PSAT/NMSQT (Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/Natl.Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test) This exam is administered once a year in October and is excellent for the practice before the SAT I. You may take it in the 9th, 10th , and/or 11th grade. The PSAT is essentially a shortened version of the SAT I. When students receive their results, they get a printout with their answers for each question, as well as the correct answers and the difficulty level of each question. The students also receive their original test booklets so they may review their results accurately. Scores for students in 11th grade are automatically entered into the National Merit Competition. Those 11th graders scoring high enough will automatically become National Merit Semifinalists or National Merit Commended Scholars.

SAT I or ACT? Historically, the SAT was the dominant test on the East and West Coasts and the ACT was the most common choice in the Midwest. Check to see which tests are required by the colleges you are applying to. Now, most four-year colleges and universities in the nation accept either ACT or SAT I scores equally. Because research indicates that many students perform quite differently on the ACT and SAT I, it may benefit you to take both tests. Colleges typically use the higher of two scores for admission, scholarship, and athletic eligibility. Testing in the spring of your junior year may help you decide if you should take a class, or take a preparation course in a area in which you scored low and then retake the test in the fall of your senior year.

THE DIFFERENCES AT A GLANCE



-The ACT math includes some trigonometry; the SAT does not.

-The SAT questions, within a particular set, appear in order of difficulty. Not true of the ACT.

-The SAT tests vocabulary much more than the ACT does.

-The ACT test English grammar; the SAT does not.

-The SAT is not a multiple choice.

-The SAT has a wrong-answer penalty; the ACT does not. Still, it pays to guess on both.

-The ACT averages four test scores-25% for English, 25% for mathematics, 25%for reading, and 25% for science reasoning. The SAT averages two scores-50% for verbal and 50% for mathematics.



SAT II-SUBJECT TESTS These are one-hour exams in specific subject areas that measure the Student’s knowledge of particular subjects and his or her ability to apply that knowledge. Check the requirements of the colleges you are considering before you decide which test to take. Some schools require certain test, and not all tests are available on each testing date. The UC’s require students to take Writing, either Math level 1 or Math Level 2, and a third test of the student’s choice. Some range from 200 to 800 for each test.

TOEFL (Test of English as a foreign Language) This test is a English exam for foreign students for whom English is not a native language. It does not substitute for the SAT I, but gives colleges additional information about the student’s language ability.

COLLEGE REPRESENTATIVES AT YOUR SCHOOL

Each year colleges send representatives to various schools to talk with prospective students. The majority of these visits occur during the fall. The representatives provide current, accurate information about the institution and the admission policies. He or she also is another contact for you with the admission office. The representative with whom you speak may be the same one who will process your application and participate in your admission decisions. Please make a good impression for our high school and yourself. The schedule of visits is generally posted on the bulletin board outside the school College Center.

Before Seeing the Representative

  • Go to the College Center and make a reservation to meet with the representative. You will receive a special permission slip to show your teacher so that you may get out of class.

  • Learn about the campus from the resources in the College Center, the catalog, view book, videotape, and from the internet web site of the college. When the representatives come, you can verify your impressions and ask further questions.

When You are With the Representative

  1. Plan to meet with the representative for about half-an-hour. If you cannot attend, you can leave a note with your name And address and request that the representative telephone you or send you information. Some representatives are in the area for a least a week at time, and is often possible to see them elsewhere in the evenings.

  2. Recognize that you are not there to impress the Representative but to gain information. Be comfortable.

  3. Be courteous, prompt, and professional.

  4. Take notes so you may refer to them later.

  5. Ask for the representative’s business card. If you apply to that school, you will want to name the representative with whom you met.



Some Questions to Ask to the Representative

  1. What is the range of GPA and SAT scores for the last freshman class?

  2. What percentage of applicants was admitted?

  3. Where do most of the students come from? Do students graduate in four or five years?

  4. How important are the other parts of the application (essay, letters of recommendation, interviews, extra-curricular)

  5. Where is the college located (urban, rural, city)? What is the area like surrounding the campus?

  6. What availability of cultural activities, shopping, restaurants, theatres, and recreational activities?

  7. What kinds of transportation are available (to the city, to the airport)? Can I have a car?

  8. Is housing guaranteed for four years? What percentage of student body participates?

  9. What athletic programs are available? Are they a major part of social life?

  10. What are the most popular, strongest, most unique, and/or alternative academics programs available?

  11. What is the smallest class size; largest class size? Do full-time faculty members or TAs teach students?

  12. What are the resources/facilities available to support my major?

  13. What is the availability of financial aid? Are there campus jobs available?

  14. Are there special scholarships for academic achievement, athletics, the arts, or leadership?

EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITES

Many students and parents ask whether involvement in extracurricular activities is an important factor to colleges in the admission process. The answer is sometimes yes and sometimes no. Extra-curricular activities including athletics, student government, clubs, work, community service, volunteer work, etc., are considered by colleges and universities in certain circumstances. For all colleges, public and private, large and small, the most important factor in a student’s application is his/her high school courses of study and the grades earned in those courses. After that come SAT and ACT test scores.

The University of California schools do consider the extra-curriculum activities of their “second cut” applicants (between 40%-60%). To see what goes into “The Comprehensive Review,” see the page in this handbook entitled, “UCLA Freshman Admission.”

Private colleges often look at what else an applicant does besides attending classes. They are concerned with creating a well-rounded freshman class and look for students to fulfill that goal. If the orchestra needs a violinist, an applicant that plays the violin will have and edge over one that doesn’t. If, on the other hand, the orchestra has enough violinists, that applicant would have no advantage. When choosing what to do or join it is better for a student to be more committed to a few activities than to have superficial involvement in many. The student should select activities that she or he truly enjoys rather than trying to ‘look good’ on a application. Colleges look for a depth and length of commitment to one or a few areas of involvement rather than a laundry list of clubs and activities.

Scholarships for both colleges and organizations weigh extracurricular heavily in their decisions. They generally look for a well-rounded student with strong academics.

SUMMER SCHOOL AND SUMMER PROGRAMS

The College & Career Center generally has information about college programs, employment, and summer opportunities.

A well-planned summer can provide students with a variety of excellent education and enrichment experiences. Students should review with their parents the following checklist in planning their summer.

  • If you receive a “D” or “F” in any subject, you may repeat the class in summer school program. Check with your guidance counselor concerning procedures for the enrolling in summer school and possible options for “making up” a grade(s).

  • Enroll in summer school to “move ahead” in a subject area or “open up” a spot to take a particular class in the fall semester.

  • Take enrichment courses in visual or performing arts at a community college.

  • Apply for a residential summer program for high school students offered by a college or a university. This is an excellent opportunity, not only to take interesting and challenging college courses, but also it gives the student the opportunity to “get a feel” for a particular college and what they offer.

  • Community service can be important in developing students’ awareness, maturity, and judgment. The summer offers students an opportunity to participate in a variety of community service programs. These programs can be found through your local church or synagogue, government agencies, hospitals, and local youth groups.

  • The summer can also be a time for paid employment or an internship.

  • Participate in a summer sports program.

EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES RECORDS

Colleges and universities are very interested in what you do in addition to going to school. They want to know what you do with your “free” time, both after school and weekends, during the school year, and during summer months and vacations. Use the worksheet to keep a record of your activities and awards. The colleges are interested in the length of time and quality of the experience, not quantity. List and describe your activities, experiences, and accomplishments. Next, rate them in order of their importance to you (*).

RATING NATURE OF ACTIVITY YOUR PARTICIPATION YOUR ACCOMPLISHMENT

9th 10th 11th 12th Hrs/wk Position Contribution

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES:
























































ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES:
















































COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
















































AWARDS & HONORS:
















































INTEREST & HOBBIES:
































WORK EXPERIENCE:






Employer

Duties

































SUMMER EXPERIENCES:






How long?

You learned?

























THE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS PROCESS

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSIONS

(Schools may require ALL or SOME of the following list. It is important to check the entrance requirements for each particular school.)

1. Entrance Exams (SAT I or ACT, SAT II)

2. Grade Point Average (GPA)

3. Specific college preparatory courses

4. Letters of recommendation

5. Personal Interview

6. Samples of previous work

7. Essay(s)

8. Personal Statement

TYPES OF ADMISSION

Standard Admission (or Regular Decision):

Application and supporting documents must be submitted by a set date in the senior year. The dates vary from November 30 through March 15. The college then takes action on all the applications and notifies all students of its decision at the same time. Notification dates are in the spring of the senior year. If accepted, the student must notify the college by May 1 of his or her intent to accept the offer of admission.

Early Action:

This program is similar to Early Decision, but the student is not committed to attend if accepted, and may continue to apply to other schools. Also, the college can deny admission as well as accepted or defer. Many of the Ivy League schools use this system.

Rolling Admissions:

The many state universities and some private schools that use this program act on an application as soon as the file is complete. The deadline for this type of admission is usually not until May 1, and these colleges usually continue to accept students until they reach capacity enrollment.

Open Admissions:

Some colleges do not practice selective admissions and offer admission to all students who apply. The community colleges are an example of this type of admission.

CHOOSING A COLLEGE

  1. Study all available information regarding colleges.

  2. Talk to alumni of the colleges, preferably in your proposed major, keeping in mind that atmosphere and requirements change with time.

  3. Talk to faculty members, the college advisor, and the guidance counselors who may be familiar with the programs at the colleges or universities you are considering.

  4. Request catalogs and additional information from the colleges.

  5. Visit each of the schools being considered. Note the following:

Physical facilities; libraries, dorms, classrooms

Current students; talk to a few and ask them questions about school

Make an appointment with an undergraduate counselor in your planned department

Make an appointment with the admission staff to discuss the school and your chances of acceptance

Take a guide tour, if available

  1. Consider college characteristics:

                  1. Major educational programs, type of school, degrees offered

                  2. Admissions policy

                  3. Location, size, climate

                  4. Cost and financial aid

                  5. College affiliation and accreditation

                  6. Campus activities

                  7. Academic reputation

  2. Utilize all available information to narrow your choices before filing applications, since application fees are non-refundable.

APPLYING FOR COLLEGE

  1. The selection process should begin in the junior year in high school, although it is never too early gathering information about colleges.

  2. Actual application should be made during the first semester of the senior year. Most colleges have application deadlines between November and February for admission in September of the following year.

  3. Plan to take any required test prior to the end of the first semester of the senior year.

  4. Obtain an unofficial transcript copy from the office. This information will be needed to complete many of the applications.

  5. Send a letter or postcard requesting information regarding admission, financial aid, and an application. The letter should include the following information about you:

  1. Name and address

  2. Expected date of high school graduation

  3. Social security number

  1. Read all information about the college to determine if the programs meet your needs.

  2. Note application deadlines for each institution so that test scores and transcripts can be secured and sent before deadlines.

  3. Complete the admission application neatly, carefully, and thoroughly. Typing is preferable.

  4. Write necessary essay(s) and have them checked by parents, friends, and teachers for errors.

  5. Make copies of all paperwork sent to any college including applications, financial aid forms, and correspondence. Send everything with a proof of mailing from the post office. DO NOT send your application by Certified Mail.

  6. File admissions applications early, especially if applying to an impacted major.

  7. Contact teachers and the Guidance Counselors well in advance to ensure that letters of recommendation will be submitted before deadlines.

  8. File early for financial aid.

  9. Follow up on all documents requested for the application or financial aid.

OBTAINING LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION AND COUNSELOR REPORT

Some colleges do not require letters of recommendation. Other colleges require that specific numbers of letters of recommendation be submitted before the application will be evaluated.

  1. Writers should be teachers unless otherwise specified on the application. The more recent the teacher, the better. Do not choose teachers from before 11th grade unless from an AP class.

  2. Carefully select writers who are familiar with your work. Each one should be able to discuss your intellectual ability and motivation.

  3. Provide each writer with the following:

  • Personal data and brag sheets including high school activities, community activities, honors, awards. Forms are available in the College Center.

  • List of colleges where the letters are be to sent including the deadlines.

  • Stamped, addressed envelope for each college where letters are to be sent.

  1. Follow up to be sure letters have been sent.

  2. Students applying to schools requiring a Counselor Report and/or Secondary School Report MUST make an appointment for a personal interview with his/her guidance counselor by Nov. 15. Instructions for this process are in the College and Career Center.

ADDITIONAL TIPS ON APPLYING

  1. To save money in non-refundable application fees, apply only to those schools that you have investigated and to which you would honestly want to attend if admitted.

  2. You may mail college applications even though you do not have SAT or ACT scores yet, however, you must send the colleges the scores once you take the tests.

  3. If you have SAT II scores on hold, you must (1) mail or FAX the Score Release Form attached to your scores to College Board and then, (2) request that the scores be sent to the colleges. If you forget this second step, the colleges will not receive your scores. (Score Release Forms may be available in your school College Center.) There will be an asterisk next to your test score if you requested a hold.

  4. An application fee of $30 or more is required for most colleges. Fee waivers for eligible students are available, but must be applied for in the College Center.

  5. Keep a file of all copies and correspondences between you and the colleges. Get proof of mailing certificates from the Post Office to prove when you mailed your applications. Pay close attention to deadlines. They are strictly enforced.

HOUSING

If you plan to live on campus, you must arrange for your own housing by following the instructions in the admissions information. Many times this process simply involves checking “YES” for housing on the application. On the other occasions, it involves writing the housing office. Become familiar with the housing procedure for the schools to which you apply. THIS IS URGENT—DO NOT DELAY!

COLLEGE ADMISSION DECISIONS

There are numerous different colleges. Each college has different approach to admitting qualified applicants and different admission factors. At the most selective colleges, criteria might include:

Courses taken

Grades and grade point average

SAT/ACT test results

Counselor/teacher recommendations

Application question and essays

Special talents and skills

Activities outside the classroom

Personal interview

Applicant’s geographic location

Alumni relationship

Major applied to

These are not arranged to reflect any specific priorities. In fact, there is not general agreement about how criteria should be ranked. Most likely, the most important admission factor is a student’s high school record, both grades, and course taken. Colleges evaluate applications in very different ways, depending on how selective, or competitive, the college is. At one extreme are “open admission” colleges. These schools require only a high school diploma and accept students on a first-come, first-serve basis. At the other extreme are very selective colleges that consider all the factors listed. These colleges admit only a small percentage of applicants each year. Most colleges fall somewhere in between.

The Criteria for…

Less Selective

Less selective colleges focus on whether applicants meet minimum requirements and whether there is a room for more students. Grades are not overlooked, but acceptable grades might be the only requirement beyond an interest in college study. The SAT or ACT may be required. But test scores might be used for course placement rather than admission decisions. Other factors might be considered, but they probably won’t play a major part.

More Selective

At more selective colleges, course work, grades, test scores, recommendations, and essays will be considered. Other things might be considered, but the major factor will be whether a student is ready for college-level study. Students would be denied admission because of some weakness in their academic preparation, less impressive grades or test scores, or a lack of interest in higher education.

Most Selective

At the most selective colleges, as many as 10 or 15 students might apply for each spot. Each applicant usually has the necessary academic qualifications, but they can’t all be accepted. Although they receive a great deal of publicity, only a small number of colleges--fewer than 100--are in this selective. Admission officers at selective colleges look carefully at every aspect of a student’s high school experience. Applicants must have academic strength and impressive SAT or ACT scores. Since so many applicants are strong academically, other factors become quite important in the admission decision.

The Importance of Extra-Curricular Activities

The importance of what a student does outside of school has been exaggerated. Selective colleges may look at extra-curricular activities, but they are only interested in applicants who have shown a long-term commitment in one or two areas. These colleges aren’t trying to enroll a class of well-rounded students; they want to admit a well-rounded group of students. An applicant with experience in a specific area might have an advantage, but it’s hard to tell which areas a college might be interested in any given year.

Filling a Need for the College

At the most selective colleges, a student must fill a need in the freshman class. Otherwise, he or she might be left out despite an outstanding academic record. That need might be something as arbitrary as the student’s home state, intended major, desire for housing on campus, or ability to play a specific musical instrument in the college orchestra. If there’s only housing for three-quarters of the freshman class, the admission decisions must reflect this limitation. If there’s only room for 25 new engineering majors, but 75 new accounting majors can be accommodated, this must also be considered as admission decision are made. On the other hand, if a college wants geographic distribution and an ethnic balance of students, admissions decisions must reflect these needs. Basically, the admission process is unpredictable and holds many potential surprises.

Finding the Right Match

Remember that “more selective” does not necessarily mean “better”. Our society often associates exclusivity with higher value. However, college is one area where that notion is wrong. Students who focus on the most selective colleges risk overlooking their own personal needs. Students should try to find colleges that provide a good match with their interests, objectives, characteristics, and needs. These colleges might be found anywhere. If a student only considers the most competitive college, the overriding concern should be allowed to take advantage of any one of them.

Need Blind” Admission

For many years, admission policies reflected the belief that the students who needed financial aid should be treated the same as those whose families could afford the total cost. This is called “need-blind” admission. However, much as changed in the recent years. A number of colleges still maintain “need-blind” admission policies. Other colleges include the family’s financial situation in the admission process. This doesn’t mean that only students with enough money are admitted, but these colleges know they can’t satisfy the financial aid needs of all applicants. Most colleges accept the strongest applicants without regard to need. Then, as financial aid resources begin to run out, students who don’t have as much academic strength are also evaluated for their family’s ability to pay. This may sound unfair, but so is accepting a student that cannot afford the school without financial help. Other colleges have a policy of meeting a portion of every accepted student’s need. A certain amount of need is left unmet for all. Unfortunately, students and parents have no control over the policies or the resources at any college. If a student needs financial aid to attend college, he or she should consider each school’s policy when deciding where to apply.

THE COLLEGE APPLICATION ESSAY

The weight given to the essay will vary from institution to institution. Some colleges and universities do not give interviews and consider the essay as a written form of an interview, a tool that helps the people making the admissions decision get to know you better. Colleges are looking for the following personal characteristics: creativity; intellectual curiosity and achievement; exceptional personal or academic recognition; unusual talent or ability; initiative; motivation; leadership; service to others; special potential; substantial experience with other cultures; and your ability to overcome or manage unusual circumstances, challenges or hardships. This is probably the most difficult part of the application process for students, but it is tremendously important because it can make the difference.

The summer after your junior year is a good time to start drafting your college essays. During the months of September and October, your senior English teacher will assist you with your college essay(s). The college and Career Center generally has books about essay writing, copies of good essays, and a “College Essay Packet.” Applicants to the University of California may select to write about one of the following two topics: (1) What you do in the classroom defines only a part of who you are. How do you spend your time when you are not in class or studying? Focus on one activity, two at the most, and discuss what you have gained from your involvement; (2) Reflecting on your family’s experiences and personal circumstances, what would you like to tell us that is not already revealed or explained sufficiently in your application? (3) If pertinent to your application, you may devote some or all of your personal statement to this topic: If there are any circumstances not evident in your application that may have affected your academic performance, explain the circumstances, and discuss how you responded to them.

Tips for Composing the Essay:

DO NOT WAIT UNTIL THE LAST MINUTE TO WRITE YOUR ESSAY!!!!

Make lists of your qualities, as you know them (particularly those the college seeks), aspirations and goals; activities; honors and awards; personal or academic shortcomings you are trying to overcome; persons or courses which have influenced your career goals or aspirations; and any specific strengths of the college and how you wish to avail yourself of them.

Write a draft, making sure to address the particular directions for discussion.

Put your draft aside for 24 hours and read again.

Make corrections in sentence construction, grammar, punctuation, and spelling. Read aloud what you have written to help you locate any rough spots you wish to rework.

Let someone else, whose opinion you respect, read and evaluate your paper.

Rewrite the essay, revising it with your evaluation in mind. Put it aside again and repeat the process until you are satisfied. Type your essay. Proofread for any errors. Make it look as perfect as you can.

Make a copy for your own files.



Sample Essay Questions:

Talk to us about a person, other than a member of your family, who has influenced you.

What particular book, play, poem, film, musical composition, or piece of visual art has affected you deeply in the past three years? Describe your reaction.

Share with us your conception of an ideal education.

If you could automatically and irrevocable change on fact or facet in the development of human history what would that change be? Why did you make this choice?

Which book(s) have affected you the most and why?

You have found the end of the rainbow. What is there?

Preparing for the College Interview

Before your interview, pick up an “INTERVIEW PACKET” from your high school College Center.

Many private colleges encourage applicants to have a personal interview. You will need to telephone the college to make arrangements to be interviewed by an admission officer at the college or by an Alumni interviewer living in the Los Angeles area. You will feel more confident about the interview process if you have done some advanced preparation and thought about how you will conduct yourself during the interview. These suggestions can help you prepare.

  1. Be prepared. Know some information about the college. Prepare some questions to ask about the college. This will help you learn more about the school while they are learning more about you. Review your copy of your application prior to the interview. The interviewer may ask for clarification of certain points. Some sample questions that you may be asked are:

    1. What special or unique qualities do you have?

    2. What can you contribute to this college? Why should you be admitted?

    3. Why did you select this particular college?

    4. What is your intended major? What sparked you interest in this field?

    5. What activities have you participated in both in and out of school? What was your contribution to these activities?

    6. What are your most significant accomplishments?

    7. What is important to you?

    8. What are your future plans? How do you propose to use them to bring about needed changes in your community or in society as a whole?

      1. Arrive early. You want to be calm, cool, and collected.

      2. Leave parents outside. The interview is for you alone.

      3. Speak so that you can be heard. You voice should be enthusiastic and sincere.

      4. Be true to yourself. It is better to admit any weaknesses and attempt to explain them before the interviewer focuses on them. If you are nervous, you can mention that, too, if makes you feel more comfortable. The interviewer will understand.

      5. Bring necessary information. You may be asked for a copy of your transcript and resume. You may be asked to give the names and addresses of references. Have a list with you.

      6. Interview the interviewer. If you participate in the conversation by asking questions, it will demonstrate interest, initiative, and maturity. It may also guide the conversation to areas where you feel most confident.

      7. First choice last. If possible, schedule your interview with your first choice school last. This will help you gain experience before you interview with your preferred school.

      8. Thank your interviewer. Always leave as cheerfully as you entered. SEND A THANK YOU NOTE.

DEFINING YOUR WANTS AND NEEDS

To be able to “make the best match” possible between you and your college, you need to determine what it is that you want and need in order for college to be a successful and enjoyable life experience. Work through the following questions carefully. Your answers have much to do with determining your future, so don’t take them lightly!

PHYSICAL FACTORS

Which areas of the country will you include? California only: ________ California: ________

Pacific Northwest: __________ Southwest: _________ Rocky Mountains: ________ Midwest: ________

Northeast: ________ South: ________ Southeastern Seaboard: _________

How did you make these choices? weather: _______ distance from home: ________ culture: _______­_

family decision: ________

How many times a year do you plan to come home? __________

Are you a “big-city” kid? Yes ______ No ______ If “yes,” what resources do you use which might

only be found in a big city? museums _______ theater _______ movies (lots of them)________

pro sports events: ________

Which types of environments will you consider? Check all that apply.

Big city: _______ suburban: _______ college town: ________ rural: ________

Do you care what the campus looks like? Yes: _______ Sort of: ________ No: ________

If “yes” or “sort of,” what do you want? ___________________________________

Campus size (undergraduate population) affects many things: your sense of community, class size,

ease of getting courses, your ability to have a personal relationship with teachers, course offering.

Check the factors, which are important to you. Sense of community: ________ class size: ________

Ease of getting courses: ________ faculty relationships: ________ course offerings: ________

Given your priorities, what campus size(s) are you interested in?

Very large (over 10,000) _______ Large (3,000-10,000) _______ Medium (1,000-3,000) _______

Small (under 2,000) ________ don’t know: ________ don’t’ care: ________

Housing. Is it important that hosing is guaranteed? Yes: ________ No: ________

Which type of dorm would you prefer?

Single sex: ________ coed by floor: _______ totally coed: __________ special interest: __________

Auto. Do you plan to take a car to school? Yes:______ No: _______ will you eliminate a college

which does not allow freshmen to have cars? Yes _________ No: _________





FINANCIAL ISSUES

Is cost a consideration? Yes:_______ No:_______ Briefly explain:

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ACADEMIC FACTORS



What degree of academic rigor (difficulty) is best for you?

High: ______medium:_______ don’t know:______ doesn’t matter: ________

How important to you is the level of intellectual stimulation in classes?

Very important______ somewhat important:________ not important: ________

ACADEMIC FACTORS (CONTINUED)



How much academic structure is important for you (core curriculum)? Remember, less structure

There is, the more self-directed you must be.

A lot:______ medium: _______ as little as possible: ________

How important to you is having access to your professors?

Very important: ____ somewhat important: _______ not important: ______

Is prestige of the college important?

Definitely: _______ somewhat: _______ not at all: _______

Are there subject areas (i.e., math, language) you particularly hate or are impossible for you?

If so, what are they? _______________________________________________________

Are there academic areas in which you have an interest and know you want to explore in college

(even if they are not your major)? If so, what are they? _______________________________

SOCIAL ISSUES

Would you consider an all women’s or all men’s college? Yes: _______ No _______ maybe _______

Would you like your college to have a religious affiliation? Yes: _______ No _______ If yes, what

Religious affiliation? ____________________________________________

Do you want your college to have sororities and fraternities?

Definitely:______ prefer, but not mandatory: ________ definitely don’t want them: ___________

Don’t care: ______________

What degree of traditional activism (football, rah-rah) do you want your college to have?

Lots: _______ some would be nice: _________ don’t care: ______________

What degree of political activism (active involvement in issues) do you want your college to have?

Lots: __________ some would be nice: _________ don’t care: ________definitely don’t want it:_______

Is a good “cultural fit” (socioeconomic level, race, etc.) important to you?

Very: ________ somewhat: ________ not particularly: _________

To what degree (that is, what percentage of the student body )? __________

What types of activities should be available as the fun part of campus life? ________________



Does the degree of alcohol/drug use on campus concern you? Yes: ________ No: ________

If “yes, in what respect?______________________________________________________________________

UNDERSTANDING FINANCIAL AID

COMMUNITY COLLEGES FOUR-YEAR COLLEGES TRADE AND TECHNICAL SCHOOLS

Students and parents who believe they may need financial aid for college should be aware of the many procedures they must follow in applying for financial aid. Because all colleges have their own requirements for financial aid candidates, students should request financial aid information as well as admissions information from each college. The College and Career Center has books on financial aid and scholarships.

HOW FINANCIAL AID WORKS The financial aid system works on one basic principle: parents and students contribute to the cost of the college to the extent they are able. The cost of a college education includes all of the following expenses to compute the actual cost of attendance: tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and available in grants, loans and work-study. The formula colleges use to determinate financial aid is simple. Like most formulas, quite a bit of information goes into determining the family’s ability to pay for college:

COSTS OF ATTENDING COLLEGE

- AMOUNT FAMILY CAN CONTRIBUTE

= FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY (NEED)

HOW FINANCIAL AID CAN HELP YOU ATTEND THE COLLEGE OF YOUR CHOICE In your investigation of colleges, it is important that you don’t rule out a college because of costs. According to the financial aid formula, college costs can vary, but your Family Contribution remains the same for each college, while your financial aid eligibility increases as the cost increases. For this reason, you can consider a range of colleges representing different costs. A more expensive school may have a higher endowment and, therefore, may offer more generous financial aid. Here is one example of how it works. Suppose your family contribution is 5,000 a year. According to the formula, you financial aid eligibility would look like this:

COLLEGE X’s TOTAL COSTS $ 18,000 COLLEGE Y’s TOTAL COSTS $ 32,000

- YOUR FAMILY CONTRIBUTION $ 5,000 -YOUR FAMILY CONTRIBUTION $ 5,000

=YOUR FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY $ 13,000 = YOUR FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY $ 27,000

WHAT IS A FINANCIAL AID PACKAGE? If you do qualify for financial aid, you will receive from each college to which you are accepted a financial aid “package.” This package usually combines several types of aid, including: Grants or Scholarships: These awards do not have to be repaid. Loans: These awards will have to be repaid, sometimes while you are still in college. Work-Study: This award involves earning money through a job, usually arranged for you by the college at the college. Since college costs vary, the amount of your financial aid package may also vary from college to college. The only constant will be the expected amount of family contribution. Some schools choose to stretch their financial aid dollars through a policy known as “gapping.” This means that they will not fully meet the total need of family, but rather come as close to family’s need as they can. Be certain to ask questions about school’s financial aid policy. When the college presents its financial aid package, do not hesitate to request more if you feel the amount is insufficient for your college costs.

HOW DO YOU FILE FOR FINANCIAL AID? Each college has its own requirements, so you must read your application materials carefully. Generally, all aid applicants must complete the Free Application for Federal Students Aid (FAFSA). For California grants, you must fill out a GPA Verification Form. Some students will also need to complete a supplemental form called the Profile. These forms are available in the college and career Center in December and should be completed and mailed in January. In order to do so correctly, most families should plan to file an early tax return in the student’s senior year so that the necessary financial data is Accurate and conforms to IRS data. File these forms early, because financial aid offices have deadlines that must be met in order to receive an optimal financial aid package.

MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS. Some awards are based on their merit; some are awarded on the basis of financial need and merit. In addition to providing reference books, which list scholarships, your College and Career Center may also make available for student use a computer software program which searches for appropriate scholarships. A word of caution: Chances are parents and their students will be contacted about “guarantee scholarships.” For a fee, you will be given information that is readily available to you FREE OF COST. These so-called scholarship search companies are of dubious benefit. A little research on your part will yield scholarship possibilities.

HELPFUL HINTS FOR A CAMPUS VISIT

The sophomore and junior years are excellent times for students and parents to tour colleges campuses. All colleges welcome visitors. If possible, visit when the colleges are in session. Before you visit the campuses, consider some of the options below. It is important to develop a list of questions and plan specific activities in order to accomplish your goals.

High School College Centers centers generally have college catalogs and reference books about visiting colleges with maps on how to get there, hotels where you can stay, restaurants, etc. Get a copy of the “Visiting Colleges Packet” and the “Interview Packet” in the College Center.

With prior arrangements, it is possible to:

  1. Have a guided tour of the campus.

  2. Indicate the people you would like to talk to (major department, admissions, financial aid, and athletic department).

  3. Sit in on classes you request.

  4. Be invited to spend the weekend on some campuses.

  5. Use the free time to walk around or talk to students.



Read the college catalog of the campus you will visit. This will give the background to help you ask more specific questions on your tour since you will have had a basic introduction to: academic requirements, course descriptions, rules and regulations, faculty credentials, admissions policies, expenses and financial aid.

To help you remember your visit, use the “College Worksheet” at the end of this College Planning Guide.

During your visit, evaluate:

  • Atmosphere of campus

  • Library and research facilities

  • Facilities in your major department

  • Major department requirements

  • Student union, dormitories

  • Opportunities for extra-curricular activities



CALL SOME OF THESE LOCAL COLLEGES AND ARRANGE A VISIT

REQUEST A CAMPUS MAP AND PARKING INFORMATION WHEN YOU CALL

CSU Long Beach (562) 985-4111

CSU Northridge (818) 677-1200

Cal Poly Pomona (909) 869-2000

Cal Poly San Obispo (805) 756-2311

Cal Tech (818) 356-6280

Chapman College (714) 997-6711

Cal Lutheran (805) 493-3135

Claremont-McKenna (909) 621-8088

Harvey Mudd (909) 621-8011

Mount Saint Mary’s (310) 471-9516

Occidental College (213) 259-2700

Otis Art Institute (213) 251-0505

Pepperdine (310) 456-4392

Pitzer College (909) 621-8129

Pomona College (909) 621-8134

Scripps College (909) 621-8149

Stanford University (415) 723-2091

UC Irvine (949) 824-6703

UCLA (213) 825-3101

UC Riverside (909) 787-3411

UC San Diego (838) 543-4831

UC Santa Barbara (805) 893-8175

USC (213) 740-1111

Univ. of Redlands (909) 335-4074

Univ. of San Diego (619) 260-4506

UC Berkeley (510) 642-3175

Whittier College (310) 907-4238

San Diego State (619) 594-5200



POTENTIAL COLLEGE ATHLETES

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) regulates many collegiate athletic programs. It establishes the rules on eligibility, recruiting and scholarships for Division I and Division II colleges and Universities. If you are planning to enroll as a college freshman and you wish to participate in Division I or Division II athletics, you must meet the minimum academic eligibility to be certified by the NCAA Eligibility Clearinghouse. This should be done at the end of your junior year. To find out more about academic eligibility and the rankings of Division I and II college teams, go to the NCAA web site http://www.ncaa.org.

Find out if you’re on track to meet academic eligibility and core high school requirements. Come to the College Center and ask for a copy of the NCAA Guide for the College-bound Student Athlete. Also pick up a copy of The Athlete’s Guide to College Scholarships, which has a lot of information about how to market your athletic talents, sample athletic resumes and sample letters to coaches. The College Center library has many books you can borrow about the college athletic recruiting process and athletic scholarships.

To be certified by the Clearinghouse for Division I, you must:

  1. Earn a GPA of the least 2.00 in a core curriculum of the least 13 academic courses taken during grades 9 through 12. The core curriculum includes: 4 years of English; 2 years of science (biology/physical); 2 years of math; 2 years of social science; 1 year of additional academic courses (English, math, or science); and 2 years of additional academic courses.

  2. Earn at least 820 on the SAT or a 68 on the ACT.





Core GPA

Minimum

Required

SAT Score

Minimum

Required

ACT Score

2.5 or above

820

68

2.4

860

71

2.3

900

75

2.2

940

79

2.1

970

82

2.0

1010

86



  1. Steps to consider in the recruiting and marketing process:

  2. In your junior year, speak to your coach about the range and quality of college athletic programs for which you might qualify. Don’t sell yourself short: coaches need back-up players as well as first stringers.

  3. Determine the range of colleges for which you are academically qualified. Bear in mind that many colleges have high academic requirements for recruited athletes. Narrow your college selection list to a manageable size, taking into consideration your fit with the academic and athletic qualities of each campus.

  4. Draft a personal letter to each coach in your sport at the colleges on your list. Find the names and addresses by going to each college’s athletic department web site. Come into the College Center for assistance. We have a Directory of College Coaches. Sample letters and resumes are also available.

  5. Consider sending a video of yourself in action. It should be no longer than five minutes.

  6. Apply to all colleges on your list.

  7. After applying, remain in touch with the college coaches. Inquire about the status of your application and request for a scholarship and/or financial aid. If possible, visit the coach and sell yourself as a person as well as an athlete.

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY

To get the latest information about the 22 Cal State Universities, pick up a copy of the Undergraduate Admissions Book in the College Center. Also, go to the Cal State University web site at www.csumentor.edu.

In recent years, the number of qualified applicants has exceeded the number of available spots for some of the freshman classes. Campuses with impacted majors require additional subject requirements; higher test scores and higher GPAs.

NOTE: All majors are impacted at San Diego State and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. In 2000, the average GPA for entering freshman at San Diego State was a 3.5. Get information about the specific eligibility requirements for these two campuses in the College Center.

MINIMUM SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS

  1. 1 YEAR U.S. History/Government

  2. 4 years college prep English

  3. 3 years math, including Geometry and Algebra II

  4. 1 year lab science

  5. 2 years foreign language

  6. 1 year visual/performing arts

  7. 3 years college prep electives chosen from the subject areas listed above

TEST REQUIREMENTS SAT I or ACT

GPA REQUIREMENTS: SAT I or ACT scores are combined with overall GPA (All college prep courses in grades 10-12) to determine admission qualifications. All required courses (regardless of when taken) must be passed with a C or better. Up to eight semesters of honors grades taken in the last two years of high school will be weighted.

GPA ACT SAT I

Score Score

GPA ACT SAT I

Score Score

GPA ACT SAT I

Score Score

GPA ACT SA T I

Score Score

GPA ACT SAT I

Score Score

3.00 and above qualifies with any score

2.99 10 510

2.98 10 520

2.97 10 530

2.96 11 540

2.95 11 540

2.94 11 550

2.93 11 560

2.92 11 570

2.91 12 580

2.90 12 580

2.89 12 590

2.88 12 600

2.87 12 610

2.86 13 620

2.85 13 620

2.84 13 630

2.83 13 640

2.82 13 650

2.81 14 660

2.80 14 660

2.79 14 670

2.78 14 680

2.77 14 690

2.76 15 700

2.75 15 700

2.74 15 710

2.73 15 720

2.72 15 730

2.71 16 740

2.70 16 740

2.69 16 750

2.68 16 760

2.67 16 770

2.66 17 780

2.65 17 780

2.64 17 790

2.63 17 800

2.62 17 810

2.61 18 820

2.60 18 820

2.59 18 830

2.58 18 840

2.57 18 850

2.56 19 860

2.55 19 860

2.54 19 870

2.53 19 880

2.52 19 890

2.51 20 900

2.50 20 900

2.49 20 910

2.48 20 920

2.47 20 930

2.46 21 940

2.45 21 940

2.44 21 950

2.43 21 960

2.42 21 970

2.41 22 980

2.40 22 980

2.39 22 990

2.38 22 1000

2.37 22 1010

2.36 23 1020

2.35 23 1020

2.34 23 1030

2.33 23 1040

2.32 23 1050

2.31 24 1060

2.30 24 1060

2.29 24 1070

2.28 24 1080

2.27 24 1090

2.26 25 1100

2.25 25 1100

2.24 25 1110

2.23 25 1120

2.22 25 1130

2.21 26 1140

2.20 26 1140

2.19 26 1150

2.18 26 1160

2.17 26 1170

2.16 27 1180

2.15 27 1180

2.14 27 1190

2.13 27 1200

2.12 27 1210

2.11 28 1220

2.10 28 1220

2.09 28 1230

2.08 28 1240

2.07 28 1250

2.06 29 1260

2.05 29 1260

2.04 29 1270

2.03 29 1280

2.02 29 1290

2.01 30 1300

2.00 30 1300

Below 2.00 does not

Qualify for regular

Admission.

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY (CSU)

This checklist is design to help you determine your eligibility for admission to any campus of the California State University system. For the latest information, go to http://www.csumentor.edu/

CALIFORNIA STATE CHECKLIST

Submit All Application Materials On Time.

Obtain application from your counselor during October.

Mail in completed application during November.

Check CSU Admission Requirements.

Ask your counselor for a list of courses approved as college preparatory for CSU.

Ask your counselor if you might qualify for special admission requirements.

Determine YOUR Grade Point Average (GPA).

Step 1. Multiply each semester grade of courses taken in the 10th, 11th, or 12th grade except physical education

and military science (ROTC). Summer school courses count; even those taken between grades 9

and 10 may be used. Repeated courses-use the attempt with the highest earned grade. Honors courses

taken in grades 11 and 12 (maximum of 8 courses) receive additional grade points for GPA calculations

one additional point is earned for each grade of A, B, or C received in honors course.



________ A s x 4=_________

________ B s x 3=_________

________ C s x 2=_________

Honors Course(s)________ A’s x 5=_________

Honors Course(s)________ B’s x 4=_________

Honors Course(s)________ C’s x 3=_________

Total Grades _________ _________Total points

Step 2. Add total grades earned: _________

Step 3. Add total grades points : _________

Step 4. Divide total grade points (Step 3) by total grades (Step 2). This is your CSU GPA:_________

Eligibility may based upon four semesters (grades 10 and 11). Grades from grade 12 will be used if needed

to qualify for admission or if you already have completed grade 12.

NOTE: This chart assumes all classes have the same number of credits. Your school may be different.

Take Required Test.

Take the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT I) OR American College Test (ACT).

Take the TOEFL examination if you have not attended at the least three years of school at the high school level or beyond where English is the principal language of instruction.

Check GPA Eligibility Index

Eligibility Index is based on combination of GPA and test scores.

If GPA is below 2.00, you are not eligible for regular admission.

If the GPA is from 2.00 to 2.99, check Eligibility Index to determine if the GPA is above 2.99, test scores will not be a factor in the admission determination unless you apply for an impacted program.

Look For Space Reservation.

If the campus accepts your application for consideration, you will receive either an early admission notice or a space reservation. Space reservation is NOT a guarantee of admission.

Submit your official high school transcript when instructed to do so by CSU. Ask your registrar to

Send it. Remember that CSU needs a final transcript showing that you graduated from high school.

Be sure your test scores are sent to the colleges by the testing company.

Questions? Contact your counselor.

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENT

To get all the latest information about the UC campuses and the eligibility requirements, pick up a copy of introducing the University of California in your school career center. Also, go to the University of California web site at http://www.ucop.edu/pathways/

In recent years, the number of freshman applicants for some UC campuses has far exceeded the number of spaces available. The most selective UCs get over 30,000 applications a year for approximately 3,500 freshman spots. When campuses cannot accept all eligible applicants, it uses standards that are more demanding than the minimum requirements to select students. Many departments require additional preparation in math and lab science beyond the “a-f” minimum requirements.

  1. All courses must appear on MHS ‘UC Approved Course List,” a copy of which is included in this Handbook.

  2. Only advanced fine art classes are acceptable for the “f” requirement.

  3. Grades earned in requirement academic courses taken in 9th grade or earlier will not be used in calculating the GPA for admission. All required courses (regardless of when taken) must be passed with a c or better.



Minimum Subject Requirements “a-f” Pattern

7th

8th

9th


<10th


11th


12th













a” U.S HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE-2 years required











b” COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH-4 years required











c” MATHEMATICS-3 years required, 4 years recommended Algebra land 2, geometry ,trig-calculus











d ”LAB SCIENCE- 2 years required,3 years recommended. At least 2 of these 3 disciplines; biology or marine biology, chemistry and physics.











e” LANGUAGE-2 years required,3-4 years recommended. Minimum 2 years of the same language











f” COLLEGES PREP ELECTIVES(UC approved only)-2years required.

Psych, sociology, economics, advanced visual/performing arts, advanced math, lab science, third year of language, creative writing











UC ELILIBILITY INDEX

The eligibility index includes high school GPA and SAT I test scores. The GPA continues to be the most important factor in the index. The minimum GPA required for UC eligibility is 2.80, and all students (even those with the highest GPA’s) are required to meet minimum test score requirements. The test score formula is [SAT I composite] +[2x SAT II writing=SAT II math= third required SAT II)]. NOTE: The SAT II scores are weighted much more heavily than the SAT I scores. SAT I COMPOSITE=1,600 maximum points and three SAT II scores= 4,800 maximum points.

Eligibility

a-f” SAT

GPA Total

        1. 4640

        2. 4384

        3. 4160

        4. 3984

        5. 3840

        6. 3720

        7. 3616

        8. 3512

SAT Total

[SAT I composite]+[2x(SAT II

II) equals SAT Total.

Combined mathematics

Highest individual SAT

Considered.

Index

a-f” SAT

GPA Total

        1. 3408

        2. 3320

        3. 3248

        4. 3192

        5. 3152

        6. 3128

>_3.50 3120





Writing = SAT II Math = third SAT

SAT I composite is highest

And verbal scores from a single sitting.

II scores, from any sitting, will be

ACT to SAT Conversion

ACT Equivalent

SAT score

  1. 1600

  2. 1580

  3. 1520

  4. 1470

  5. 1420

  6. 1380

  7. 1340

  8. 1300

  9. 1260

  10. 1220

  11. 1180

  12. 1220

  13. 1180

  14. 1140

  15. 1110


Table

ACT Equivalent



  1. 1070

22 1030

21 990

20 950

19 910

  1. 870

  2. 830

  3. 780

15 740

14 680

13 620

12 560

11 500

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

UC APPROVED COURSE LIST

To be acceptable to the University of California, courses must meet the “a-f” requirements on High School’s UC Approved Course list

(“a”)- HISTORY

U.S. History, U.S. History (AP)

U.S Government, U.S. GOVT.(AP)

World History

(“f”) ELECTIVE COURSES

HISTORY

All courses listed under (“a”)



ENGLISH

(“b”) ENGLISH

English 9-12

English 9 (H), English 10 (H)

ENGLISH 11 (AP), English 12 (AP)

All courses listed under (“b”) plus the

Following:

Speech/Debate

Creative Writing

(“c”) MATHEMATICS (*may

only be used for the “c” requirement)

*Algebra A-Algebra B

*Algebra A1/A2- Algebra B1/B2

Algebra 2/ Trigonometry (H)

*Geometry, Geometry (H)

*Intermediate Algebra

Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus

Calculus AB (AP)

Calculus BC (AP)

Journalism II

Humor/Literature/Film



ADVANCED MATH

All courses beyond advanced Algebra listed

Under (‘c”)

LABORATORY SCIENCE

All courses listed under “d”) plus the following:

Lab Oceanography

Marine Biology, Marine Biology (H)

Physical Science, Physical Science (H)

(“d”) LABORATORY SCIENCE

Lab Biology, Lab Biology (H)

Lab Chem, Lab chem. (H), Lab Chem (AP)

Physics, Physics AP

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Economics

Sociology

Psychology

(“e”) FOREING LANGUAGE

Spanish I-IV, Spanish V (AP)

Spanish Nat Spk ½

French I-IV

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS

Advanced String Ensemble

Advance Wind Ensemble

Advance Studio Art (AP)

Art Seminar

Ceramics/ Sculpture



NOTE: Only the underlined courses will be assigned extra honors credit by the University of

California: (A=5, B=4, C=3)

UCLA FRESHMAN ADMISSION

The information in this flyer describes the admission and selection criteria for freshman applicants to UCLA. You should use it as a guide when you fill out your application for admission to ensure that you provide us with the most complete information about yourself.

UCLA undergraduates represent a select group of extraordinary students. Each year UCLA receives an increasing number of applications. Because of the demand, admission to UCLA is highly selective. The vast majority of Bruins come from California, and UCLA has the most racially, ethnically, and culturally diverse group of undergraduates in the country. At least 50 percent of the entering class is selected solely on academic criteria. The reminder of the class is selected on a combination of academic performance and personal achievement, identified through the comprehensive review.

The Academic Review

  1. In our Academic Review, we assess and balance a variety of academic factors to determine the overall scholastic strength of each applicant. UCLA does not use a formula to determine admission. The academic criteria considered are:

  1. Academic grade point average.

Performance on the standardized tests:

The Scholastic Assessment Tests:

ACT Assessment, and SAT II Subject Tests,

Including the Writing Test, Mathematics, and

Additional subjects.

Number of and performance in Honors,

Advancement Placement (AP), International

Baccalaureate (IB0), and college courses.

The strength of the senior year program.

Quality, quantity, and level of coursework

through the entire high school program,

especially coursework completed beyond

the minimum courses required for eligibility

to the University of California.

The strength of the program taken within the

context of the high school attended.



THE COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW

Applicants not selected in the Academic Review receive a Comprehensive Review. The remainder of the freshman class is selected after this review. Both academic and personal elements are considered at this time. While commitment to intellectual development and academic progress continues to be of primary importance, the Personal Statement also forms and integral part of this review.

The following provides the primary elements considered in the Comprehensive Review:

Academic Elements

  • A progressively challenging academic program, including honors/AP/IB courses.

  • Enrollment in college-level courses or academic coursework sponsored by post-secondary institutions

  • Advanced Placement exams completed, as well as planned.

  • Participation in activities, which develop academic or intellectual abilities.

  • Presence of summer session/inter-session courses,

                  1. which enhance academic progress.

  • Mastery of academic subjects as demonstrated by high grades or high test scores.

  • Honors and /or awards in recognition of academic, intellectual, or creative achievement.

  • Self-knowledge as reflected in the personal

  • Statement.

Personal Elements

  1. Extensive leadership and initiative in school and/ or community organizations/activities.

  2. Recognition for extracurricular activities.

  3. Special talents

  4. Ethnic/cultural awareness.

  5. Overcoming general life challenges particular to the urban or rural environment of the student, personal/family situation, social or economic difficulties, or lack of educational opportunities.

LOS ANGELES







2.89-2.99



247/9

3.6%

139/6

4.3%

14/1

7.1%

400/16

4.0%

3.00-3.29

124/0

0.0%

582/24

4.1%

1360/95

7.0%

905/113

12.5%

110/14

12.7%

3081/246

8.0%

3.30-3.59

120/0

0.0%

743/58

7.8%

2138/246

11.5%

1952/383

19.6%

370/133

35.9%

5323/820

15.4%

3.60-3.89

93/4

4.3%

710/79

11.1%

2653/449

16.9%

3472/1021

29.4%

716/385

53.8%

7644/1938

25.4%

3.90-3.99

12/0

0.0%

89/9

10.1%

500/100

20.0%

867/307

35.4%

173/126

72.8%

1641/542

33.0%

4.00

25/0

0.0%

347/48

13.8%

2124/442

20.8%

4507/2233

49.5%

2342/1992

85.1%

9345/4715

50.5%

OVERALL

374/4

1.1%

2471/218

8.8%

9022/1341

14.9%

11842/4063

34.3%

3725/2651

71.2%

30163/8437

28.0%

RIVERSIDE







2.89-2.99



242/91

37.6%

90/60

66.7%

11/9

81.8%

343/160

46.6%

3.00-3.29

107/54

50.5%

611/416

68.1%

1018/860

84.5%

434/408

94.0%

36/36

100.0%

2206/1774

80.4%

3.30-3.59

160/150

93.8%

799/768

96.1%

1628/1588

97.5%

770/757

98.3%

65/65

100.0%

3422/3328

97.3%

3.60-3.89

89/88

98.9%

650/637

98.0%

1457/1427

97.9%

844/838

99.3%

91/91

100.0%

3131/3081

98.4%

3.90-3.99

8/8

100.0%

77/76

98.7%

207/203

98.1%

169/169

100.0%

14/14

100.0%

475/470

98.9%

4.00

23/20

87.0%

237/233

98.3%

764/755

98.8%

750/745

99.3%

185/183

98.9%

1959/1936

98.8%

OVERALL

387/320

82.7%

2374/2130

89.7%

5316/4924

92.6%

3057/2977

97.4%

402/398

99.0%

14249/11963

84.0%

SAN DIEGO







2.82-2.99



245/1

37.6%

153/0

0.0%

17/3

17.6%

415/4

1.0%

3.00-3.29

95/0

0.0%

579/3

0.5%

1491/10

0.7%

1022/57

5.6%

125/19

15.2%

3312/89

2.7%

3.30-3.59

89/0

0.0%

636/17

2.7%

2233/128

5.7%

1936/417

21.5%

344/161

46.8%

5238/723

13.8%

3.60-3.89

58/3

5.2%

579/3

13.0%

2559/567

22.2%

3195/1572

49.2%

587/469

79.9%

6978/2686

38.5%

3.90-3.99

8/0

0.0%

65/23

35.4%

455/174

38.2%

707/458

64.8%

122/117

95.9%

1357/772

56.9%

4.00

17/6

35.3%

249/118

47.4%

1901/1007

53.0%

3720/3088

83.0%

1659/1541

92.9%

7546/5760

76.3%

OVERALL

267/9

3.4%

2108/236

11.2%

8884/1887

21.2%

10733/5592

52.1%

2854/2310

80.9%

28466/10786

37.9%

SANTA

BARBARA







2.82-2.99



403/19

4.7%

175/16

9.1%

17/4

23.5%

595/41

6.9%

3.00-3.29

123/4

3.3%

812/128

15.8%

2163/393

18.2%

1117/404

36.2%

82/46

56.1%

4297/975

22.7%

3.30-3.59

116/14

12.1%

894/267

29.9%

2649/911

34.4%

1689/948

56.1%

193/183

94.8%

5541/2323

41.9%

3.60-3.89

73/18

24.7%

668/306

45.8%

2520/1292

51.3%

2252/1903

84.5%

263/261

99.2%

5776/3780

65.4%

3.90-3.99

9/4

44.4%

71/41

57.7%

376/270

71.8%

485/471

97.1%

47/47

100.0%

988/833

84.3%

4.00

15/8

53.3%

209/126

60.3%

1482/1255

84.7%

2229/2182

97.9%

508/499

98.2%

4443/4070

91.6%

OVERALL

336/48

14.3%

2654/868

32.7%

9593/4140

43.2%

7947/5924

74.5%

1110/1040

93.7%

24768/12455

50.3%

SANTA CRUZ







2.82-2.99



310/27

8.7%

155/33

21.3%

22/18

81.8%

487/78

16.0%

3.00-3.29

84/14

16.7%

493/195

39.6%

1313/786

59.9%

791/616

77.9%

77/73

94.8%

2758/1684

61.1%

3.30-3.59

75/55

73.3%

503/427

84.9%

1413/1284

90.9%

968/916

94.6%

124/122

98.4%

3083/2804

91.0%

3.60-3.89

51/44

86.3%

369/335

90.8%

1235/1168

94.6%

1106/1084

98.0%

164/161

98.2%

2925/2792

95.5%

3.90-3.99

2/2

100.0%

45/35

77.8%

198/196

99.0%

234/230

98.3%

35/35

100.0%

514/498

96.9%

4.00

6/4

66.7%

105/92

87.6%

648/626

96.6%

1114/1093

98.1%

368/367

99.7%

2241/2182

97.4%

OVERALL

218/119

54.6%

1515/1084

71.6%

51117/4087

79.9%

4368/3972

90.9%

790/776

98.2%

14102/10536

74/7%

UNVERSITY OFCALIFORNIA-FRESHMAN PROFILE

The Profile summarizes by UC campus the qualifications of applicants and admitted freshman fall 1999. Be cautious in drawing conclusions from this information. The data are useful only as a general guide to selectivity, rather than to predict your chances for admission to a particular campus or program. The UCs use SAT II scores and the number of high school honors courses in this selection process, and these are not included in this profile. In each block, the first figure is the total number of applicants and the second figure is the number of applicants regularly admitted. The figure in bold type on the second line is the percentage of students who were regularly admitted.

ALL PROGRAMS EXCEPT ENGINEERING

GPA SAT COMPOSITE

490-790 800-990 1000-1190 1200-1390 1400-1600 OVERALL


BERKELEY







2.82-2.99



149/10

6.7%

115/4

3.5%

16/0

0.0%

280/14

5.0%

3.00-3.29

61/6

9.8%

288/23

8.0%

831/65

7.8%

730/48

6.6%

138/9

6.5%

2048/151

7.4%

3.30-3.59

65/11

16.9%

408/33

8.1%

1336/94

7.0%

1620/116

7.2%

423/45

10.6%

3852/299

7.8%

3.60-3.89

52/4

7.7%

421/57

13.5%

1726/175

10.1%

3025/414

13.7%

830/259

31.2%

6054/909

15.0%

3.90-3.99

5/1

20.0%

59/14

23.7%

353/48

13.6%

798/181

22.7%

198/107

54.0%

1413/351

24.8%

4.00

21/5

23.8%

210/59

28.1%

1673/506

30.2%

4775/2100

44.0%

3179/2405

75.7%

9858/5075

51.5%

OVERALL

204/27

13.2%

1386/186

13.4%

6068/898

14.8%

11063/2863

25.9%

4784/2825

59.1%

25796/7072

27.4%

DAVIS







2.82-2.99



207/11

5.3%

111/6

5.4%

14/1

7.1%

332/18

5.4%

3.00-3.29

75/7

9.3%

432/81

18.8%

1144/284

24.8%

708/238

33.6%

71/59

83.1%

2430/669

27.5%

3.30-3.59

91/53

58.2%

543/207

38.1%

1605/671

41.8%

1157/673

58.2%

146/139

95.2%

3542/1743

49.2%

3.60-3.89

60/31

51.7%

521/256

49.1%

1750/1139

65.1%

1689/1548

91.7%

275/265

96.4%

4295/3239

75.4%

3.90-3.99

4/2

50.0%

68/46

67.6%

314/262

83.4%

385/378

98.2%

50/49

98.8%

821/737

89.8%

4.00

11/9

81.8%

204/148

72.5%

1281/1177

91.9%

2075/2016

97.2%

669/635

94.9%

4240/3985

94.0%

0VERALL

241/102

42.3%

1768/738

41.7%

6301/3544

56.2%

6125/4859

79.3%

1225/1148

93.7%

18755/11673

62.2%

IRVINE







2.82-2.99



306/7

2.3%

140/8

5.7%

14/4

28.6%

332/18

5.4%

3.00-3.29

143/0

0.0%

744/71

9.5%

1449/311

21.5%

739/271

36.7%

67/28

41.8%

3142/681

21.7%

3.30-3.59

137/7

5.1%

754/261

34.6%

1839/1217

66.2%

1216/975

80.2%

178/161

90.4%

4124/2621

63.6%

3.60-3.89

80/2

2.5%

617/269

43.6%

1801/1452

80.6%

1777/1716

96.6%

311/306

98.4%

4586/3745

81.7%

3.90-3.99

8/2

25.0%

79/41

51.9%

296/258

87.2%

373/361

96.8%

48/47

97.9%

804/709

88.2%

4,00

20/2

10.0%

253/130

51.4%

1178/1070

90.8%

1585/1553

98.0%

502/489

97.4%

3538/3244

91.7%

OVERALL

388/13

3.4%

2447/772

31.5%

6869/4315

62.8%

5830/4884

83.8%

1120/1035

92.4%

19016/11412

60.0%

UC AND CAL STATE ADDRESSES

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA- http://www.ucop.edu/pathwyas/

UC BERKELEY (22,800 undergrads)

110 Sproul Hall #5800

Berkley, CA 94720-5800

(510) 642-3175

UC DAVIS (19,468 undergrads)

1 Shields Avenue

Davis, CA 95616-8507

(530) 752-3710

UC IRVINE (15,522 undergrads)

204 Administration Building

Irvine, CA 92697-1075

(949) 752-2971

UCLA (24,103 undergrads)

1147 Murphy Hall, Box 951436

Los Angeles, CA 90095-1435

(310) 825-3101

UC RIVERSIDE (9,281 undergrads)

1138 Hinderaker Hall

Riverside, CA 92521

(909) 787-3411

UC SAN DIEGO (16,303 undergrads)

Dept. 0337, 9500 Gilman Drive

La Jolla, CA 92093-0013

(858) 534-4831

UC SANTA BARBARA (17,068)

1234 Cheadle Hall

Santa Barbara, CA 93106-2014

(805) 893-2485

UC SANTA CRUZ (9,960 undergrads)

Cook House, 1156 High Street

Santa Cruz, CA 95064

(831) 459-4008

UC SAN FRANCISCO

(Graduate School Only)

CAL STATE UNIVERSITY- http://www.calstate.edu

CSU BAKERSFIELD (5,400)

9001 Stockdale Hwy

Bakersfield, CA 93311-1099

(661) 664-2011

CSU CHICO (14,000)

400 W. First Street

Chico 95929-0247

(530) 898-4636

CSU DOMINGUEZ HILLS (10,400)

1000 East Victoria St.

Carson, CA 90747

(310) 243-3696

CSU FRESNO (17,200)

5241 N. Maple

Fresno, CA 93740

(559) 278-42470

CSU FULLERTON (24,000)

800 N. State College Blvd

Fullerton, CA 92831

(714) 278-2011

CSU, HAYWARD (13,000)

4700 Ygnacio Valley Road

Concord, CA 94521

(510) 885-2624

HUMBOLDT STATE (7,700)

1 Harpst Street

Arcata, CA 95521

(707) 826-3011

CSU LONG BEACH (27,400)

1250 Bellflower Blvd.

Long Beach, CA 90840

(562) 985-4111

CSU LOS ANGELES (18,900)

5151 State Univ. Dr.

Los Angeles, CA 90032

(323) 343-3000

CSU MONTERREY BAY (1,300)

100 Campus Center

Seaside, CA 93955-8001

(831) 582-3330

CSU NORTHRIDGE (27,200)

18111 Nordhoff St.

Northridge, CA 91330

(818) 677-1200

CAL POLY POMONA (16,800)

3801 W. Temple Ave.

Pomona, CA 91768-4003

(909) 869-7659

CSU SACRAMENTO (23,400)

6000 J Street

Sacramento, CA 95819

CSU SAN BERNARDINO (12,200)

5500 University Pkwy

San Bernardino, CA 92407

(909) 880-5000

SAN DIEGO STATE (30,000)

5300 Campanille Dr.

San Diego, CA 92182-0771

(619) 594-5200

CSU SAN FRANCISCO (27,400)

1600 Holloway Avenue

San Francisco, CA 94132

(619) 594-5200

SAN JOSE STATE (25,900)

1 Washington Square

San Jose 95192-0009

(408) 924-1000

CAL POLY SAN LUIS OBISPO

(17,000)

1 Grand Avenue

San Luis Obispo, CA 93407

(805) 756-1111

CSU SAN MARCOS (4,400)

333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Rd.

San Marcos, CA 92096-0001

(760) 750-4000

SONOMA STATE (7,000)

1801 E. Cotati Avenue

Rohnert Park, CA 94928

(707) 664-2880

CSU STANISLAUS (6,100)

801 W. Monte vista Avenue

Turlock, CA 95380

(800) 561-1945

(209) 667-3122

MARITIME ACADEMY (350)

200 Maritime Academy Dr.

Vallejo, CA 94590

CALIFORNIA PRIVATE AND INDEPENDENT

COLLEGES

LOS ANGELES BASIN

American Academy of Dramatic Arts West, Pasadena

Art Center College of Design, Pasadena

Azusa Pacific University, Azusa

Biola University, La Mirada

California Baptist College, Riverside

California Family Study Center (See Phillips Graduate Institute)

California Institute of the Arts, Valencia

California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

California Lutheran University,

Thousand Oaks

Chapman University, Orange

Claremont Graduate School, Claremont

Claremont McKenna College, Claremont

Concordia University, Irvine

Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena

Harvey Mudd College, Claremont

La Sierra University, Riverside

Loma Linda University, Loma Linda

Los Angeles College of Chiropractic, Whittier

Loyola Marymount University,

Los Angeles

Marymount College, Palos Verdes

The Master’s College, Santa Clarita

Mount Saint Mary’s College, Los Angeles

Occidental College, Los Angeles

Otis College of Art and Design,

Los Angeles

Occidental College, Los Angeles

Pacific Christian College, Fullerton

Pacific Oaks College, Pasadena

Pepperdine University, Malibu

Phillips Graduate Institute,

North Hollywood

Pfitzer College, Claremont

Pomona College, Claremont

Scripps College, Claremont

Southern California College, Costa Mesa

Southern California College of Optometry, Fullerton

University of Judaism, Los Angeles

University of La Verne, La Verne

University of Redlands, Redlands

University of Southern California,

Los Angeles

Whittier College, Whittier

Woodbury University, Burbank



SAN DIEGO METRO AREA

National University, San Diego (Systemwide Office)

Point Loma Nazarene College,

San Diego

United States International University, San Diego

University of San Diego, San Diego



SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

California Colleges of Arts and Crafts, Oakland

California School of Professional Psychology,

San Francisco (Systemwide Office)

Cogswell Polytechnical College, Sunnyvale

College of Notre Dame, Belmont

Dominical College of San Rafael,

San Rafael

Golden Gate University, San Francisco

Holy Names College, Oakland

John F. Kennedy University, Orinda

Menlo College, Atherton

Mills College, Oakland

Pacific Graduate School of Psychology, Palo Alto

Patten College, Oakland

Saint Mary’s College of California, Moraga

Samuel Merritt College, Oakland

San Francisco Art Institute,

San Francisco

San Francisco Conservatory of Music,

San Francisco

Santa Clara University, Santa Clara

Stanford University, Stanford

University of San Francisco,

San Francisco

Outlying Cities

The Fielding Institute, Santa Barbara

Fresno Pacific College, Fresno

Humphreys College, Stockton

Monterrey Institute of International Studies, Monterrey

Pacific Union College, Angwin

Simpson College, Redding

Thomas Aquinas College, Santa Paula

University of the Pacific, Stockton

Westmont College, Santa Barbara

Association of Independent

California Colleges and Universities

1100 Eleventh Street, Suite 315

Sacramento, CA 95814

916/446-7626

COMMUNITY COLLEGE

TRANSFER STUDENT

All community college offer a full range of academic courses that enable a student to prepare for a transfer to a four-year college or university. If you are a “transfer” student and plan carefully, you may enter the four-year college as a junior after two years of community college work. Your community college counselor will help you organize a program that will be acceptable to the four-year

College, so that you will not lose any credits when you transfer.

If you want to transfer to the University of California and were not eligible for UC when you graduated from high school, you must earn a 2.8 GPA in 56 semester units of college work before being able to transfer.

If you want to transfer to a California State University and were not eligible for CSU when you graduated from high school, you must earn a 2.0 GPA in 60 semester units of college work.

If you want to transfer to a private college or an out-of-state public college, you should contact your community college to discuss what courses would be appropriate. These colleges may accept you as a transfer after less than two years of community college work

TWO-YEAR COLLEGES WITH RESIDENCES FACILITIES

  1. BAKERSFIELD COLLEGE

                  1. 1801 Panorama Drive

                  2. Bakersfield, CA 93305

  2. BROOKS COLLEGE (Private)

                  1. 4825 E. Pacific Coast Highway

                  2. Long Beach, CA 90804

                  3. (213) 498-2241

  3. BUTTE COLLEGE

                  1. 3536 Butte College Drive

                  2. Oroville, CA 95965

  4. COLLEGE OF THE

                  1. REDWOODS

                  2. 7351 Tompkins Hill Road

                  3. Eureka, CA 95501

  5. COLLEGE OF THE SISKIYOUS

800 College Avenue

Weed, CA 96094

  1. COLUMBIA COLLEGE

                  1. P.O Box 1849

                  2. Colombia, CA 95310

                  3. (209) 533-5106

  2. D-Q University

                  1. P.O. Box 409

                  2. Davis, CA 95617

                  3. (916) 758-0470

  3. FEATHER RIVER COLLEGE

                  1. P.O. Box 1110

                  2. Quincy, CA 95971

                  3. (916) 283 0202

  4. KINGS RIVER COMMUNITY

                  1. COLLEGE

                  2. 995 N. Reed

                  3. Reedly, CA 93654

  5. LASSEN COLLEGE

                  1. P.O. Box 3000

                  2. Susanville, CA 96130

                  3. (916) 257-6181

  6. MARYMOUNT COLLEGE

                  1. (Private)

                  2. 0800 Palos Verdes Drive East

                  3. Rancho Palo Verdes, CA 90274

                  4. (213) 377-5501

  7. MENLO COLLEGE (Private)

                  1. Atherton, CA 94027

  8. SANTA BARBARA CITY

                  1. COLLEGE (Limited)

                  2. 721 Cliff Drive

                  3. Santa Barbara, CA 93109

                  4. (805) 965-0581

  9. SANTA ROSA JUNIOR

                  1. COLLEGE

                  2. 1501 Mendocino Avenue

                  3. Santa Rosa, CA 95401

                  4. (707) 527-4799

  10. SHASTA COLLEGE

                  1. P.O. Box 496006

                  2. Redding, CA 96099

                  3. (916) 225-4600

  11. SIERRA COLLEGE

                  1. 5000 Rocklin Road

                  2. Rocklin, CA 95677

                  3. (916) 624-3333

  12. TAFT COLLEGE

                  1. 29 Emmons Park Drive

                  2. Taft, CA 93268

                  3. (805) 763-4282

  13. WEST HILLS COLLEGE

                  1. 300 Cherry Lane

                  2. Coalinga, CA 93210

  14. YUBA COLLEGE

2088 n. Beale Road

Marysville, CA 95901

(916) 741-6720





















































COMMUNITY COLLEGE



This list includes many of the available occupational, certificate, and transfer programs. For information about a particular program, contact the guidance office at the specific community college.



NON-TRANSFER PROGRAMS LEADING TO A CERTIFICATE OF

ACHIEVEMENT AND/OR TO A TWO-YEAR DEGREE





AGRICULTURE AND

ENVIRONMENTAL

Agri-business

Animal Health Tech

Animal Science

Ornamental Horticulture

Wastewater Tech

Water Pollution Process Tech

ARCHITECTURE/

ENVIRONMENT DESIGN

Architectural Tech

Interior Design

BUSINESS AND OFFICE

Accounting

Full Charge Services

Administrative Services

General office

Legal

Secretarial

Word Processing

Business Information Systems

Mini-Computer

Operator training

Real State

COMMUNICATION ARTS

Advertising Design

Commercial Art

Illustration Design

Music

Music Instrument Repair

Photography

Writing Communications

DISTRIBUTION, MARKETING &

DISPLAY

Business Management & Marketing

Display & Visual Promotion

Fashion Merchandising

HEALTH

Dental Assisting

Dental Tech

Electrodiagnostic Tech

Human Services

Medical Assisting

Administration/Clinical

Medical Clerical Cluster

Health Records Clerical

Medical Transcription

Unit Secretarial

Nursing (AA, RN.)

Nursing Career Ladder:

LVN to RN

Nutrition Care

Psychiatric Tech

Respiratory Care (Inhalation Therapy)

SERVICES

Admin. of Justice

Admin. of Justice-Security

Airline Flight Services

Air Transportation

Apartment Maintenance

Barbering

Clothing and Textiles

Dressmaking

Fashion Design

Cosmetology

Educational Services

Food Services Management

Home Management

Hotel Management

Housekeeping- Admin.

In Home Services

Instructional Aide

Interpreting for Deaf People

Legal Assistant

Nursery School

Travel Agency

TECHNOLOGY

Airframe Tech

Architectural Tech

Auto Pain Tech

Civil Tech

Construction Inspection

Construction Tech

Building Construction

Construction Mgmt.

Construction Project

Management

Culinary Arts

Diesel Engine Mechanic

Drafting

Electrical Maintenance

Energy Engineering

Energy Conservation

Power Engineering

Solar Engineering

Energy Management

Energy Tech

Food Prep

Graphic Arts Tech

Machine Tech

Manufacturing Tech

Marine Tech

Motorcycle Tech

Petroleum Tech

Plastics Tech

Quality Assurance

Small Business Machine

TRANSFER PROGRAMS LEADING A

4-YEAR COLLEGE DEGREE

LIBERAL STUDIES

AGRICULTURE

ARCHITECTURE

BUSINESS

Accounting

Business Administration

Business Education

Food Administration (Diabetics)

Management

Marketing Merchant

English

Foreign Language

Literature

Speech

Other Related:

Journalism

Pre-speech Pathology

COMPUTER SCIENCE

EDUCATION

ENGINEERING

FINE AND APPLIED ARTS

HEALTH SCIENCES

Pre-professional programs:

Dental Hygiene

Dietetics (clinical)

Environmental Health

Medical Records Admin.

Nursing

Occupational Therapy

Physical Therapy

Radiological Safety

Pre-Dentistry

Pre-Medicine

Pre-Pharmacy

Pre-Veterinary Medicine

HOME ECONOMICS

MATHEMATICS

PHYSICAL-RECREATIONAL

EDUCATION

SCIENCE

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Related: Pre-Law

TECHNOLOGY

Industrial Arts-Education/Tech

Electronics



THE PERSONAL RESUME



Creating a personal resume serves two purposes. It focuses your self-assessment, presenting relevant information about your educational experience. It gives admission representatives a quick overview when you attend college fairs, speak with representatives at your high school, interview with alumni, or make college visits. Develop your own one-page resume according to your individual needs and preferences.



A copy of an athletic resume is available in the College and Career Center.



General Resume

JONATHAN DOE Year graduate: 1999

Social Security Number # 000-0000-000 GPA: 3.7889

12345 School Road PSAT: Verbal 720/Math 540

Malibu, CA 90265 ACT E 28/Math 22/Reading 27

(310) 457-0000

Education: Your High School

City, State Zip

Phone

Academic: Under this heading, list all academic related items including academic honors, awards, honor roll, etc. Don’t be shy-list them. As you receive more, add them to the list.

Extra-Curricular: Limit your items to those things you have done in high school. Don’t delve back into elementary school. Give years of involvement.

Athletics: If you have been extensively involved in any one activity such as athletics, music, drama, etc., you could list this area separately and give all of your specific activities related to this subject under this heading.

Give years of involvement, such as:

Instrumental Music- grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Football grades 9, 10, 11

Wrestling grades 10, 11, 12

Work Experience: List all your jobs here, briefly describe your duties and give years employed.

Community Service: Under this heading, you could list civic, cultural, or religious organizations, scouts, etc.

COMMUNICATING YOUR INTEREST

Communication is key to a successful search and selection experience. To request information and applications, a telephone call or communication through the Internet(e-mail) is in order. Also, call to arrange campus visits and tours through the admissions office. The sample letters below present appropriate responses for some of the many situations you will confront.





THANK YOU FOR THE ALUMNI INTERVIEW



Date



Name of Alumnus or Alumna

Street Address

City, State, Zip



Dear________________



Thank you for taking the time from your busy schedule to give me the opportunity to discuss (name of college or university) and my qualifications for admission. You were most helpful. Your personal experience has given me a better understanding of why I would like to attend (name of college).



Sincerely,



Signature

Name and Social Security Number

Your Street Address

City, State, Zip

Telephone








REQUEST FOR INFORMATION LETTER



Date



Director of Admissions

College Name

Address



To Whom it may concern:



I am a student at Malibu High School and will graduate in

2000 Please send me all pertinent information so that I

can apply for admission, financial aid and scholarships.



I m particularly interested in your department of urban planning. I would also appreciate information about your swim team and your student-operated radio station.



Thank you for your assistance.



Sincerely yours,



Signature

Name and Social Security Number

Address

Telephone

GETTING ORGANIZED

As you moved through the college exploration process during the next 12-15 months, you will want to develop a system for keeping track of all pertinent information. It is a challenging and exciting process. It will flow much smoother if you get organized before you begin.

1. Contact colleges by mail, Internet, or phone to request information about the college, financial aid and specific majors. You may also ask for sports information. If you would like to participate in college athletics, contact the coaches directly. If you contact the colleges now, you will be on their mailing list. They will notify you about the campus open houses and when their representatives will visit next fall.

2. Here’s a “CRATE” idea to help you get organized. Purchase a plastic crate made for hanging file folders. As you begin to receive information from the colleges, you can set up a file for each one. As you weigh each college choice, move the college files around, arranging them in order of preference at that particular time. This order may change as you progress through this process. Make folders for:

    1. Each college you are considering.(10-15 folders)

    2. PSAT, SAT I, SAT II, ACT Test information, and scores. Registration bulletins and test booklets.

    3. Career planning information.

    4. College planning information

    5. Financial aid information (FAFSA, GPA Verification form, Federal and State Workbooks).

    6. Essays and personal statements. (Keep copies of all essays).

    7. Student information form, brag sheet, activities list, resume, awards.

    8. Interview and campus visit information and guidelines.

    9. NCAA Clearinghouse and athletic information if applicable. Military/ROTC information if necessary.

    10. Scholarships information and copies of applications.

                  1. 3. Make a timeline checklist for each college (forms are available in the College Center)

          1. Name of college, address, admissions office, phone number, name of college representative who visit

                  1. your school or information meeting.

          2. What standardized tests are required? When did you send test scores?

          3. Application deadline. Date application was sent.

          4. Recommendations requested? List teachers whom you asked.

          5. Interview date. (Always get the name of person who interviewed you.)

          6. Transcripts requested? When? Did you request that the registrar send your transcript?

          7. Mid-year transcript sent? Did you provide envelopes and postage?

          8. Housing application requested and mailed? Deposit?

                  1. HINTS:

                  2. 1. Have a large separate calendar somewhere in your room. Mark all deadlines on this calendar immediately

                  3. when you receive materials from the colleges.

        1. Put your name and social security number on every check and put a copy of the check in your folder.

        2. Use a certificate of mailing ($.55) for each application. Keep this receipt in the college folder.

        3. Do not send anything Priority or Overnight Mail; it makes you look unprepared.

        4. Always write a thank you note to an interviewer or representative who has taken extra time with you.

        5. Meet with the colleges reps that visit your high school. Write a “schmooze” note with your address and phone

number, etc., explaining why you cannot meet with them (test, project due). Your counselor can give it to the

rep. attend meetings for parents and students at Los Angeles hotels.

COLLEGE WORKSHEET

COLLEGE NAME______________________________________

Contact Person:

LOCATION

City, sate

Distance from home


SIZE

Enrollment

Physical size of campus


ENVIRONMENT

School setting (urban, rural)

Location & size of nearest city

Co-ed, male, female

Religious affiliation


ADMISSION

REQUIREMENTS

Deadline- early, regular

Test required average test scores, GPA

Special requirements

Notification date


ACADEMICS

Your major offered

Special requirements

Hours of homework

Student-faculty ratio

Typical class size


COLLEGE EXPENSES

Tuition, room & board

Estimated total budget

Application fee, deposits


FINANCIAL AID

Deadline

Required forms

% receiving aid

kinds of scholarships


HOUSING

Residence hall requirement

Availability

Types and sizes

Food plan


FACILITIES

Academic

Recreational

other


ACTIVITIES

Clubs, organizations

Greek life

Athletics, intramurals

other


CAMPUS VISITS

When

Special opportunities



KEEPING TRACK OF COLLEGE APPLICATIONS

This checklist covers the major items for college admissions. Make a folder for each college to which you apply.

Keep copies of all letters, Essays and applications that you send as well as all communication and forms that you

Receive from the college. Check and date each item on this list as you complete it.



COLLEGE______________________________Telephone No.____________________

Application Deadline:Early Decision/ Action_______________ Regular_______________

Financial Aid Deadline: Profile or college’s form__________FAFSA/GPA Verification Form________



ITEM

DATE

COLLEGE CONFIRMS

RECEIPT OF

Application materials requested



Application received



Application sent to college. Certificate of mailing requested



Application fee paid






Campus visit arranged



Interview (if recommended or required)






Test scores forwarded to college



SAT I



SAT IIs



ACT



Additional new scores sent






School report form, official transcript, brag sheet given to

Counselor or Administrator



Request for letter of recommendation with brag sheet and

Envelope addressed to college given to:



1. (name)



2. (name)



3. (name)



Financial aid forms sent. Certificate of Mailing requested.



FAFSA



GPA Verification Form



Profile or college’s form for financial aid.



Received Student Aid Report (SAR0



Returned corrected SAR, if necessary



Forwarded final SAR to college attending






7th semester transcript sent, if requested



Midyear report forms to Counselor



Letter of acceptance received



Letters (SIR) sent to colleges notifying them if you will or

Will not attend



Registration deposit paid



Forwarded housing deposit



Final transcript requested (in June)









COLLEGE REFERENCE GUIDES

The following guidebooks provide quick access to basic information about schools and the college admissions process. These and many other books are available in the College and Career Center and may be checked out. They also may be purchased at the local bookstores.

STRAIGHTFORWARD AND FACTUAL GUIDES:

Profiles of American Colleges-Barrons

The college Handbook- College Board

The Index of College Majors-College Board

Peterson’s Annual Guide to Four Year Colleges

Colleges with programs for students with learning Disabilities- Charles Mangrum

Peterson’s Professional Degree Programs in the Visual and Performing Arts

The Multicultural Student’s Guide to Colleges-Robert Mitchell

The Complete book of Colleges- Princeton Review

LIVELY AND OPINIONATED GUIDES:

Princeton Review’s Best 311 Colleges

The Fiske Guide to Colleges-Edward Fiske

The insider’s Guide to College-The Yale Daily News

Looking Beyond the Ivy League- Finding the College That’s right for You- Loren Pope

The Public Ivys- Richard Moll

Peterson’s Competitive Colleges

The Best Buys in College Education- Edward Fiske

The Gourman Report: A Rating of Undergrad Programs in America- Jack Gourman

Rugg’s Recommendations on the Colleges- Frederick E. Rugg

Colleges that Change Lives- Loren Pope

COLLEGE ADMISSIONS:

A is for Admission: The insider’s Guide to Getting into the Ivy League- Michele Hernandez

Questions and Admissions- Reflections of 1000,000 Standford Applications- Jean Fetter

The College Admissions Mystique- Bill Mayher

Playing the Private College Admission Game- Richard Moll

Scaling the Ivy Wall in the 90’s- Howard Greene

How to get into the Right College- Edward Fiske

College Admissions- Getting Into the College of your Choice- Princeton Review

The College Match: a Blueprint for choosing the Best School for you- Steven Antonoff

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID

Don’t Miss Out- The Ambitious Student’s Guide to Financial Aid- Anna Leider

The Scholarship Book- Daniel J. Cassidy

The College Money Handbook- Peterson’s Guide

Financial Aid for College- Pat Ordovensky

Kaplan Scholarships- Arranged by area of study and by school

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID:

Don’t Miss Out- The Ambitious Student’s Guide to Financial Aid- Anna Leider

The Scholarships Book- Daniel J. Cassidy

The College Money Handbook- Peterson Guide

Financial Aid for College- Pat Ordonvensky

Kaplan Scholarships- Arranged by area of study and by school

ATHLETIC INFORMATION:

Peterson’s Sport Scholarship & College Athletic Programs

Advising Student Athletes through the College Recruitment Process- Michael Koehler

The Winning Edge- The Student- Athlete’s Guide to College Sports- Francis Kilpatrick

THE COLLEGE EXPERIENCE:

Summer on Campus: College Experiences for High School Students- College Board

Letting Go: A parents Guide to Understanding the College Years- Karen Coburn

College Life- Ellen Rosenberg

INTERNET SITES

The sites below are only a sample of the links that are listed on the College and Career Center’s website.

SITES WITH COLLEGE INFORMATION

California State Universities- CSU Mentor-http://www.csumentor.com

Information about all CSU campuses and on line application

University of California Pathways- http://www.ucop.edu/pathways

University of California information and application on line

The Common Application- http://www.nassp.org

Used by over 200 private and independent colleges. Download for free.

College Board Online-http://www.collegeboard.org

Do a personalized college search and generate personalized list of colleges. Test

Prep information

College View- http://www.collegeview.com

Do a college search, research colleges.

Peterson’s Education http://www.petersons.com

College databased, vocational schools, summer programs

Kaplan Educational Services-http://www.Kaplan.com

Search for colleges that match you interest, advice on applying to college. Test prep information.

National Collegiate Athletic Association(NCAA) http://www.ncaa.org

Information about eligibility, clearinghouse, recruiting guidelines. Links to individuals who specialize in

Specific sports.

Testprep.Com http://www.testprep.com?wwmain.sat.html

Free online tutorial on the SAT



SITES WITH FINANCIAL AID AND SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION



Financial Aid Information-http://www.finaid.org

Has the most links to financial aid related sites ranging from institutions to scholarships.

FASTWEB http://www.fastweb.com

Excellent free scholarship search database. More than 180,000 private scholarships, grants and loans.

Don’t Miss Out- Ambitious Student’s Guide to Financial Aid- http://www.educaid.com/

Signet Bank Student Loan Home page contains entire version of one of the best financial aid guides.

Federal Financial Aid Information-http://fsa4schools.ed.gov/SCHOOLSWebApp/index.jsp

FAFSA form on line. Federal Government’s “Student Guide.”

Kaploan-http://www.kaptest.com/

Information about student loan programs. Free estimator and tips.

U.S News-http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/eduhome.htm

Best values, finding funds, calculate costs, expert advice.

College View http://www.collegeview.com

Information about financial aid. Fill out questionnaire and get an “estimated family contribution.”



SITES WITH CAREER INFORMATION



Occupational Outlook Handbook-http://www.bls.gov/oco/

Has information on hundreds of careers. Learn about education requirements, salary potential, job

Prospects. Get addresses where you can write for more information.

College Board http://www.collegeboard.com/apps/careers/index

Do a career interest inventory. Then research the careers on your personalized list.

Princeton Review http://www.review.com/career

Get a profile of your career styles and interest. Will generate a personalized list of careers.

National Association for College Admission Counseling

STUDENT’S RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

IN THE COLLEGE ADMISSION PROCESS WHEN YOU APPLY TO COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES YOU HAVE RIGHTS

Before You Apply:

  1. You have the right to receive factual and

                  1. Comprehensive information from colleges

                  2. Universities about their admission,

                  3. Financial cost, aid opportunities, practices

                  4. And packaging policies, and housing

                  5. Policies. If you consider applying under an

                  6. Early admission, early action or early decision

                  7. Plan, you have a right to complete information

                  8. From the college about it processes and

                  9. Policies.

                  10. When You are Offered Admission:

  2. You have the right to wait to respond to an offer

                  1. Of admission and/or financial aid until May 1.

  3. Colleges that request commitments to offers of

                  1. Admission and/or financial aid until May 1.

                  2. Must clearly offer you the opportunity to request

                  3. (in writing) an extension until May 1. They must

                  4. grant you this extension and your request may not

                  5. jeopardize you status for admission and/ or

                  6. financial aid. (This right does not apply to

                  7. candidates admitted under an early decision

                  8. program.)

                  9. If You Are Placed on A Wait List or Alternate List:

  4. The letter that notifies you of that placement

                  1. Should provide a history that describes the

                  2. Number of students on the waiting list, the

                  3. The number offered admission, and the

                  4. Availability of financial aid and housing.

  5. Colleges may require neither a deposit nor a

                  1. Commitment as a condition of remaining on a

                  2. Wait list.

  6. Colleges are expected to notify you of the

                  1. Resolution of your wait list status by August

                  2. 1 at the latest.

                  3. WHEN YOU APPLY TO COLLEGES AND

                  4. UNIVERSITIES YOU HAVE RESPONSiBILITIES

                  5. Before You Apply:

  7. You have the responsibility to research and understand

                  1. The policies and procedures of each college or

                  2. University regarding application fees, financial aid,

                  3. Scholarships, and housing. You should also be sure

                  4. That you understand the policies of each college or

                  5. University regarding deposits that may be required to

                  6. Make before you enroll.

                  7. As You Apply:

  8. You must complete all material that is required for

                  1. application, and submit your application on or before

                  2. The published deadlines. You should be the sole author of

                  3. your applications.

  9. You should seek the assistance of your high school

                  1. Counselor early and throughout the application period.

                  2. Follow the process recommend by your high school

                  3. For filling college applications.

  10. It is your responsibility to arrange, if appropriate, for

                  1. Visits to and/or interviews at colleges of your choice.

                  2. After You Receive Your Admission Decisions:

  11. You must notify each college or university which

                  1. Accepts you whether you are accepting or rejecting

                  2. Its offer. You should make these notifications as soon

                  3. As you have made a final decision as to the college that

                  4. You wish to attend, but no lather than May 1.

  12. You may confirm your intention to enroll and, if

                  1. Required, submit a deposit to only one college or

                  2. University. The exception to this arises if you are

                  3. Put on a wait list by a college or university and are

                  4. Later admitted to that institution. You may accept

                  5. The offer and send a deposit. However, you must

                  6. Immediately notify a college or university at which

                  7. You previously indicated your intention to enroll.

  13. If you are accepted under an early decision plan, you

Must promptly withdraw the applications submitted

To other colleges and universities and make no

Additional applications. If you are an early decision

Candidate and are seeking financial aid, the previously

Mentioned withdrawal of other applications presumes

That you have received notification about financial

Aid.

If you think that your rights have been denied, you should contact the college or university immediately to request additional information or the extension of a reply date. In addition, you should ask your counselor to notify the president of the state or regional affiliate of the National Association for College Admission Counseling. If you need further assistance, send a copy of

Any correspondence you have had with the college or university and a copy of your letter of admission to Executive Director,

NACAC, 1631 Prince Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2818.